Shannon Bond Shannon Bond is a business correspondent at NPR, covering technology and how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.
Shannon Bond
Stories By

Shannon Bond

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Shannon Bond
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Shannon Bond

Tech Correspondent

Shannon Bond is a business correspondent at NPR, covering technology and how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.

Bond joined NPR in September 2019. She previously spent 11 years as a reporter and editor at the Financial Times in New York and San Francisco. At the FT, she covered subjects ranging from the media, beverage and tobacco industries to the Occupy Wall Street protests, student debt, New York City politics and emerging markets. She also co-hosted the FT's award-winning podcast, Alphachat, about business and economics.

Bond has a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School and a bachelor's degree in psychology and religion from Columbia University. She grew up in Washington, D.C., but is enjoying life as a transplant to the West Coast.

Story Archive

A jury has ordered conspiracy theorist Alex Jones to pay millions of dollars for spreading lies about the Sandy Hook school massacre. But his influence in right-wing media and politics remains strong. Matt York/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt York/AP

How Alex Jones helped mainstream conspiracy theories become part of American life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1115936712/1116135524" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As the economy stalls, big tech companies prepare for tougher times

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1114417041/1114417042" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Facebook is revamping its default feed to include more recommended posts and videos from strangers, picked by artificial intelligence. Facebook hide caption

toggle caption
Facebook

Facebook is making radical changes to keep up with TikTok

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1113724820/1113890067" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Elon Musk's tweets mocking Twitter's lawsuit are displayed on a smartphone with Twitter logo in the background in this illustration photo taken on July 18, 2022. CHRIS DELMAS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
CHRIS DELMAS/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter's lawsuit sets the social media company and the world's richest man up for a lengthy, expensive and high-stakes battle. Soumyabrata Roy/NurPhoto via Getty Images; Patrick Pleul/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Soumyabrata Roy/NurPhoto via Getty Images; Patrick Pleul/picture alliance via Getty Images

Twitter takes Elon Musk to court, accusing him of bad faith and hypocrisy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1111032233/1111205337" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Twitter says it will take Elon Musk to court over cancelled purchase of the company

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1110667066/1110667067" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Elon Musk arrives for the 2022 Met Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 2, 2022, in New York. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Elon Musk wants out of the Twitter deal. It could end up costing at least $1 billion

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1110539504/1110644322" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

'The Pallbearer's Club:' a memoir on friendship — and a vampire thriller

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1109607702/1109607703" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

How much more will your July 4 barbecue cost this year?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1109607688/1109607689" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Minnesota legalized THC edibles and infused drinks ... by accident?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1109607674/1109607675" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Supreme Court says police can't be sued for not reading out Miranda rights

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1109607667/1109607668" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

One Black abortion clinic fears being further targeted by the justice system

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1109607660/1109607661" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Vieux Farka Touré helped introduce Malian music to the U.S. He's back with album 6

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1109607653/1109607654" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript