Shannon Bond Shannon Bond is a correspondent at NPR, covering how misleading narratives and false claims circulate online and offline, and their impact on society and democracy.
Shannon Bond
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Shannon Bond

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Shannon Bond
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Shannon Bond

Correspondent

Shannon Bond is a correspondent at NPR, covering how misleading narratives and false claims circulate online and offline, and their impact on society and democracy.

She previously covered technology for NPR's Business desk, focused on how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.

Bond joined NPR in 2019. She previously spent 11 years as a reporter and editor at the Financial Times in New York and San Francisco. She also co-hosted the FT's award-winning podcast, Alphachat, about business and economics.

Bond has a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School and a bachelor's degree in psychology and religion from Columbia University.

Story Archive

Clark County Election Department workers process polling place equipment and materials at an initial verification area at the Clark County Election Department after polls closed on November 08, 2022 in North Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images) Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Misinformation's Limited Impact On The Midterms

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The departures of thousands of Twitter workers is raising fears about the stability of the influential social media site under new owner Elon Musk. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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How likely is a complete Twitter meltdown?

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Twitter CEO Elon Musk gives staff an ultimatum, and many people are choosing to go

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Twitter in San Francisco. The social media company has laid off thousands of workers and contractors, including many involved in determining whether material on the site broke the site's policies or violated U.S. or foreign laws. David Odisho/Getty Images hide caption

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Twitter employees quit in droves after Elon Musk's ultimatum passes

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Ballot counters process absentee ballots on Nov. 8 at Huntington Place in Detroit. The scene this year was much calmer than 2020, when protesters descended on Detroit and yelled for election officials to "stop the count!" Jose Juarez/AP hide caption

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Jose Juarez/AP

Election officials feared the worst. Here's why baseless claims haven't fueled chaos

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Debunked film causes Republicans to mobilize, raising concerns of voter intimidation

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Fences surround the Maricopa County Tabulation and Elections Center (MCTEC) in Phoenix, Arizona, on Oct. 25, 2022, to help prevent incidents and pressure on voters at the ballot drop box. Olivier Touron/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Touron/AFP via Getty Images

How documentary-style films turn conspiracy theories into a call to action

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Elon Musk regularly tweets and shares controversial things on Twitter, but now that he's the boss, his actions take on new significance. In this photo, Musk arrives for the Met Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 2, 2022, in New York. ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Elon Musk said Twitter wouldn't become a 'hellscape.' It's already changing

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A poll worker handles ballots for the midterm election, in the presence of observers from both Democrat and Republican parties, at the Maricopa County Tabulation and Elections Center in Phoenix on Oct. 25. Olivier Touron/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Touron/AFP via Getty Images

False information is everywhere. 'Pre-bunking' tries to head it off early

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Conspiracy theories about Brazil's electronic voting machines, shown here, have spread online. Far-right influencers in the U.S. have seized on Brazil's election as a way of keeping conspiratorial narratives alive ahead of the U.S. midterms in early November. Caio Guatelli/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Why false claims about Brazil's election are spreading in far-right U.S. circles

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How Elon Musk would reshape how Twitter works

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Billionaire Elon Musk's on-again, off-again bid to acquire Twitter advanced this week after he agreed to pay the $44 billion he had originally offered for the social media site. Michael Gonzalez/Getty Images hide caption

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Here's what Elon Musk will likely do with Twitter if he buys it

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