Shannon Bond Shannon Bond is a business correspondent at NPR, covering technology and how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.
Shannon Bond
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Shannon Bond

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Shannon Bond
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Shannon Bond

Tech Correspondent

Shannon Bond is a business correspondent at NPR, covering technology and how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.

Bond joined NPR in September 2019. She previously spent 11 years as a reporter and editor at the Financial Times in New York and San Francisco. At the FT, she covered subjects ranging from the media, beverage and tobacco industries to the Occupy Wall Street protests, student debt, New York City politics and emerging markets. She also co-hosted the FT's award-winning podcast, Alphachat, about business and economics.

Bond has a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School and a bachelor's degree in psychology and religion from Columbia University. She grew up in Washington, D.C., but is enjoying life as a transplant to the West Coast.

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Story Archive

Rashad Robinson is president of Color of Change, one of the groups organizing an advertising boycott of Facebook for the month of July. Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images hide caption

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Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images

Over 400 Advertisers Hit Pause On Facebook, Threatening $70 Billion Juggernaut

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Big Brands Boycott Facebook, Calling For A Crackdown On Malicious Content

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Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden is blasting Facebook for its refusal to fact-check political speech. John J. Kim/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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John J. Kim/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

CEO Mark Zuckerberg's hands-off approach to President Trump has set off a public revolt among Facebook employees that is the company's biggest challenge this year. George Frey/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Critics Slam Facebook But Zuckerberg Resists Blocking Trump's Posts

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Mark Zuckerberg Faces Revolt Among Facebook Employees

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Ryan Roslansky, who became LinkedIn's CEO this week, said "offensive" comments during a meeting about racism "reinforced the very hard work we still have to do." Kelly Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Facebook's decision to label state-controlled media is part of an effort to take a more assertive stance against misinformation in advance of the 2020 U.S. presidential election. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

CEO Mark Zuckerberg is under pressure from former and current employees who are frustrated with his lack of action on the president's posts. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is under pressure from employees who say President Trump is violating the social network's rules against inciting violence. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook Employees Revolt Over Zuckerberg's Hands-Off Approach To Trump

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Rent the Runway has temporarily closed stores during the pandemic as customers have shied away from using its clothing rental service. Kelly Sullivan/Getty Images for Rent the Runway hide caption

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Kelly Sullivan/Getty Images for Rent the Runway

Who Dares To Rent A Dress Now? Coronavirus Upends The Sharing Economy

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Trump Uses Executive Order To Crack Down On Social Media Companies

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