Shannon Bond Shannon Bond is a business correspondent at NPR, covering technology and how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.
Shannon Bond
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Shannon Bond

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Shannon Bond
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Shannon Bond

Tech Correspondent

Shannon Bond is a business correspondent at NPR, covering technology and how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.

Bond joined NPR in September 2019. She previously spent 11 years as a reporter and editor at the Financial Times in New York and San Francisco. At the FT, she covered subjects ranging from the media, beverage and tobacco industries to the Occupy Wall Street protests, student debt, New York City politics and emerging markets. She also co-hosted the FT's award-winning podcast, Alphachat, about business and economics.

Bond has a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School and a bachelor's degree in psychology and religion from Columbia University. She grew up in Washington, D.C., but is enjoying life as a transplant to the West Coast.

Story Archive

Facebook whistleblower's testimony spurs calls for regulation

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Ex-Facebook employee Frances Haugen testifies before Senate panel

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Hear What A Facebook Insider Told Congress About How Its Apps Hurt Kids

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Facebook whistleblower testifies before a Senate panel

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Former Facebook employee Frances Haugen testified before a Senate subcommittee after leaking internal research showing the company knew about Instagram's negative impact on some teens. She says that Facebook consistently chooses profit over safety. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Facebook asked a federal judge on Monday to dismiss the FTC's lawsuit alleging the company bought Instagram and WhatsApp to stifle competition in the social networking market. Chesnot/Getty Images hide caption

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Antigone Davis, Facebook's global head of safety, testifies remotely Thursday before a Senate subcommittee following leaks of internal research showing the company knows the harm its apps cause young people. Patrick Semansky/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Senators Blast Facebook For Concealing Instagram's Risks To Kids

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Facebook Will Be Back On Capitol Hill To Face Senators' Questions

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The waiting area of a pop-up vaccination site at St. John The Divine Cathedral sits empty as the rush for vaccinations winds down on June 27, 2021 in New York City. The demand for vaccinations has declined just as the Delta Plus variant of the coronavirus begins to take hold in the United States. David Dee Delgado/Getty Images hide caption

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David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Getting a religious exemption to a vaccine mandate may not be easy. Here's why

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Religious Exemptions To Vaccine Mandates Present A Dilemma For Employers

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Some leading Democratic lawmakers are accusing Amazon of profiting off the spread of COVID-19 and vaccine misinformation. Michel Spingler/AP hide caption

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Michel Spingler/AP

French actors Jean-Paul Belmondo, right, and Catherine Deneuve, in 1969. They starred together in François Truffaut's film Mississippi Mermaid. Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images hide caption

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Lyft said it would pay the legal fees for any of its drivers sued under Texas' new abortion law, which it called "incompatible" with company values. Uber quickly followed suit. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Lyft And Uber Will Pay Drivers' Legal Fees If They're Sued Under Texas Abortion Law

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