Isabella Gomez Sarmiento Isabella Gomez Sarmiento is a production assistant with Weekend Edition.
Isabella Gomez Sarmiento
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Isabella Gomez Sarmiento

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Isabella Gomez Sarmiento
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Isabella Gomez Sarmiento

Production Assistant, Weekend Edition

Isabella Gomez Sarmiento is a production assistant with Weekend Edition.

She was a 2019 Kroc Fellow. During her fellowship, she reported for Goats and Soda, the National Desk and Weekend Edition. She also wrote for NPR Music and contributed to the Alt.Latino podcast.

Gomez Sarmiento joined NPR after graduating from Georgia State University with a B.A. in journalism, where her studies focused on the intersections of media and gender. Throughout her time at school, she wrote for outlets including Teen Vogue, CNN, Remezcla, She Shreds Magazine and more.

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Story Archive

Devendra Banhart is one of two artists featured on this week's episode. Lauren Dukoff/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Lauren Dukoff/Courtesy of the artist

Roots Grow Outward

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Rosine Mbakam (left) and her mother on the set of 'The Two Faces of a Bamiléké Woman,' which represents their intergenerational differences. Icarus Films hide caption

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Icarus Films

"I got a lot of emails after we posted our first video," says violinist Dr. Erica Hardy. She says the orchestra's virtual performances are a way to give back to the community. Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR

Meet The Medical Professionals Playing Classical Music Together Online

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House Approves Bill To Create Smithsonian Museum For American Latinos

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House Majority Whip James Clyburn (right) joins fellow Democrats from the House and Senate to propose new legislation to end excessive use of force by police. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

With access to medical care limited during the pandemic, patients in countries where abortion is legal, such as Colombia, the United Kingdom and the United States, are turning to telemedicine for a prescription for drugs like mifeprostone and misoprostol to end a pregnancy. Photo Illustration by Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

A Maasai man in the Kibera slum of Nairobi, Kenya, prays next to a mural of George Floyd, painted by the artist Allan Mwangi on June 3. Gordwin Odhiambo/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Gordwin Odhiambo/AFP via Getty Images

Mark Green has stepped down as administrator of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) after nearly three years on the job. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Exiting USAID Chief On The Pandemic, Foreign Aid, Trump's Policies

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Uganda's Bobi Wine, left, and Puerto Rico's Bad Bunny have released songs about the coronavirus. Joel Saget/AFP via Getty Images; John Parra/Getty Images for Spotify hide caption

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Joel Saget/AFP via Getty Images; John Parra/Getty Images for Spotify