Emily Kwong Emily Kwong (she/her) is the co-host and reporter for NPR's daily science podcast, Short Wave.
Emily Kwong
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Emily Kwong

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Emily Kwong
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Emily Kwong

Co-host and Reporter, Short Wave

Emily Kwong (she/her) is the co-host and reporter for NPR's daily science podcast, Short Wave. The podcast explores new discoveries, everyday mysteries and the science behind the headlines — all in about 10 minutes, Monday through Friday.

Prior to working at NPR, Kwong was a reporter and host at KCAW-Sitka, a community radio station in Sitka, Alaska. She covered local government and politics, culture and general assignments, chasing stories onto fishing boats and up volcanoes. Her work earned multiple awards from the Alaska Press Club and Alaska Broadcasters Association. Prior to that, Kwong produced youth media with WNYC's Radio Rookies and The Modern Story in Hyderabad, India.

Kwong won the "Best New Artist" award in 2013 from the Third Coast/Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Competition for a story about a Maine journalist learning to speak with an electrolarynx. She was the 2018 "Above the Fray" Fellow, reporting a series for NPR on climate change and internal migration in Mongolia.

Kwong earned her bachelor's degree at Columbia University in 2012. She learned the finer points of cutting tape at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in 2013.

Story Archive

Jada Yuan with her grandmother, Chien-Shiung Wu. Wu/Yuan family hide caption

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Wu/Yuan family

Particle and experimental physicist Chien-Shiung Wu. University Archives, Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Columbia University Libraries hide caption

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University Archives, Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Columbia University Libraries

The Queen of Nuclear Physics (Part One): Chien-Shiung Wu's Discovery

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Who Else Can See Your Period Tracker Data?

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A COVID Memorial Project installation in September, 2020 marked 200,000 lives lost in the COVID-19 pandemic. The official death toll in the U.S. is on the cusp of a million. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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How Vaccine Misinformation Spread Through The Parenting World

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The Importance Of The Vaginal Microbiome

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With Roe v. Wade primed to be overruled, people seeking abortions could soon face new barriers in many states. Researcher Diana Greene Foster documented what happens when someone is denied an abortion in The Turnaway Study. Malte Mueller/Getty Images hide caption

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A landmark study tracks the lasting effect of having an abortion — or being denied one

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U.S. President George Bush jokes with French marine biologist Jacques Cousteau, center, and Jo Elizabeth Butler, the legal adviser of the Climate Change Secretariat, in Rio de Janeiro after signing the United Nations Convention on Climate Change, June 12, 1992. The draft was hammered out the month before in New York. Dennis Cook / AP hide caption

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Dennis Cook / AP

A Climate Time Capsule, Part 2: The Start of the International Climate Change Fight

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A Climate Time Capsule (Part 1): The Start of the International Climate Change Fight

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Signs on a temporary fence around the U.S. Supreme Court building on May 05, 2022 in Washington, DC. Anna Moneymaker / Getty Images hide caption

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The Turnaway Study: What The Research Says About Abortion

A leaked draft opinion in the Supreme Court case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization has placed uncertainty on the future of abortion rights in the United States. As written, the opinion would overturn Roe v. Wade protections. We at Short Wave were immediately curious about the data behind abortions: What happens when pregnant people are denied abortions?

The Turnaway Study: What The Research Says About Abortion

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A beaver throws some twigs on top of his dam as his partner eats some grass near the shore. Taken in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. Getty Images hide caption

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Why it took nearly 100 years for umami to be globally accepted as a distinct flavor

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Encore: A daughter's journey to reclaim her heritage language

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A medical worker administers tests at a Covid-19 testing site in New York City. New York City and other places in the Northeast are seeing an uptick in infection numbers. Spencer Platt / Getty Images hide caption

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