Emily Kwong Emily Kwong is the reporter for NPR's daily science podcast, Short Wave.
Emily Kwong
Stories By

Emily Kwong

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Emily Kwong
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Emily Kwong

Reporter, Science Desk

Emily Kwong (she/her) is the reporter for NPR's daily science podcast, Short Wave. The podcast explores new discoveries, everyday mysteries and the science behind the headlines — all in about 10 minutes, Monday through Friday.

Prior to working at NPR, Kwong was a reporter and host at KCAW-Sitka, a community radio station in Sitka, Alaska. She covered local government and politics, culture and general assignments, chasing stories onto fishing boats and up volcanoes. Her work earned multiple awards from the Alaska Press Club and Alaska Broadcasters Association. Prior to that, Kwong produced youth media with WNYC's Radio Rookies and The Modern Story in Hyderabad, India.

Kwong won the "Best New Artist" award in 2013 from the Third Coast/Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Competition for a story about a Maine journalist learning to speak with an electrolarynx. She was the 2018 "Above the Fray" Fellow, reporting a series for NPR on climate change and internal migration in Mongolia.

Kwong earned her bachelor's degree at Columbia University in 2012. She learned the finer points of cutting tape at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in 2013.

Story Archive

The radio telescope in Parkes, Australia is used by SETI researchers to search for potentially alien radio transmissions. TORSTEN BLACKWOOD/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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TORSTEN BLACKWOOD/AFP via Getty Images

Did E.T. Phone Us?

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JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

In their research, Andrea Ford and Giulia De Togni found that period tracking app users valued the control over their personal health the apps enabled. Most users they spoke with see the commodification of their personal data as a tradeoff they're forced to make. Ana Maria Serrano/Getty Images hide caption

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Ana Maria Serrano/Getty Images

A male ruby-throated hummingbird is one of the birds featured in the board game Wingspan. Elise Amendola / AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola / AP

People wait in line to get tested for COVID-19 at a testing facility in Times Square on December 9, 2021 in New York City. Spencer Platt / Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt / Getty Images

Air Force veteran Danyelle Clark-Gutierrez and her service dog, Lisa, shop for food at a grocery store. Lisa helps Clark-Gutierrez cope with post-traumatic stress disorder after she experienced military sexual trauma. Stephanie O'Neill for KHN hide caption

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Stephanie O'Neill for KHN

Dr. Jasmine Marcelin has been involved with free community events in North Omaha to provide and address concerns about the COVID-19 vaccines. Taylor Wilson / Nebraska Medical Center hide caption

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Taylor Wilson / Nebraska Medical Center

Delta-8-THC is derived from the cannabidiol (CBD) in hemp plants. Gillian Flaccus/AP hide caption

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Gillian Flaccus/AP

The Science Of The Delta-8 Craze

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Dermatologist Dr. Jenna Lester treats her patient Geoffry Blair Hutto in the UCSF Primary Care clinic. Barbara Ries hide caption

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Barbara Ries

Earlier this month, crew aboard the International Space Station received a a novel item in their cargo re-supply: a Zero-G oven and cookie dough. NASA/Nanoracks hide caption

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NASA/Nanoracks

Our Favorite Things, Short Wave-style

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Dr. Francis Collins, Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), holds up a model of COVID-19, known as coronavirus, during a Senate Appropriations subcommittee hearing on the plan to research, manufacture and distribute a coronavirus vaccine, Thursday, July 2, 2020, in Washington. Saul Loeb/AP hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AP

For now, a person is considered fully vaccinated against COVID two weeks after receiving the second dose of an mRNA vaccine or the single dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. But some health experts think that definition should be updated to include a booster shot. JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

Audio recorders in treetops are powered with solar panels. One aspect of the SAFE Acoustics Project is to monitor ecosystem health through sound. SAFE Acoustics hide caption

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SAFE Acoustics

What Does A Healthy Rainforest Sound Like? (encore)

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People hold signs as several hundred anti-mandate demonstrators rally outside the Capitol during a special legislative session considering bills targeting COVID-19 vaccine mandates in Tallahassee, Florida. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP