Brit Hanson Brit Hanson is a producer for NPR's science podcast, Short Wave.
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Brit Hanson

Brit Hanson

Producer, Short Wave

Brit Hanson (she/her) is a producer for NPR's science podcast, Short Wave. The podcast explores new discoveries, everyday mysteries and the science behind the headlines — all in about 10 minutes. She's produced episodes ranging from why some fruit ripens faster in paper bag to the dangers of tear gas during a respiratory pandemic and the evolution of HIV treatment.

Prior to working at NPR, Hanson was a freelancer reporter and producer, an editor at St. Louis Public Radio and a reporter and producer at North Country Public Radio. Her work has earned multiple Edward R. Murrow Awards, awards from the Associated Press and Public Media Journalists Association and the Public Service Journalism Award from The Society for Professional Journalists. Hanson is a proud alumnus of the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies.

Story Archive

Dr. Jasmine Marcelin has been involved with free community events in North Omaha to provide and address concerns about the COVID-19 vaccines. Taylor Wilson / Nebraska Medical Center hide caption

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Taylor Wilson / Nebraska Medical Center

Much of the movie 'Contact' was filmed at the Very Large Array in New Mexico. Erin Slonaker/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Slonaker/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

A healthcare worker inoculates 59 year-old Raymon Diaz with a dose of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine during a vaccination campaign as part of the "Noche de San Juan" festivities in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

A nurse administers a COVID-19 vaccine to a nine-year-old child in Tustin, CA. Mark Rightmire/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Rightmire/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Parents, We're Here To Help! Answers To Your COVID Vaccine Questions

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Machakos, Kenya- Oct 28, 2021. D.Light Territory Sales Executive Stanlas Kisilu installs a solar light outside Winifred Muisyo's home. Khadija Farah for NPR hide caption

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Khadija Farah for NPR

A Kenyan mother and her two children sit on their bed under a mosquito net used to prevent malaria. Wendy Stone/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Sake, a three year old Bonobo at the Lola's Sanctuary. Ley Uwera for NPR hide caption

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Ley Uwera for NPR

Bonobos and the evolution of nice

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Why music sticks in our brains

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Ben Elliott gets barreled at the BSR Surf Resort, where artificial waves are attracting world-class talent. Rob Henson/BSR Surf Resort hide caption

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Rob Henson/BSR Surf Resort

The Surf's Always Up — In Waco, Texas

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How To Start Hormone Replacement Therapy

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Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, second from right, speaks during a news conference on Operation Warp Speed in January, 2021. With Azar from left are Dr. Moncef Slaoui, chief science adviser to Operation Warp Speed, Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and U.S. Army Gen. Gustave Perna, chief operating officer of Operation Warp Speed. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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