Brit Hanson Brit Hanson is a producer for NPR's science podcast, Short Wave.
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Brit Hanson

Brit Hanson

Associate Producer, Short Wave

Brit Hanson (she/her) is a producer for NPR's science podcast, Short Wave. The podcast explores new discoveries, everyday mysteries and the science behind the headlines — all in about 10 minutes. She's produced episodes ranging from why some fruit ripens faster in paper bag to the dangers of tear gas during a respiratory pandemic and the evolution of HIV treatment.

Prior to working at NPR, Hanson was a freelancer reporter and producer, an editor at St. Louis Public Radio and a reporter and producer at North Country Public Radio. Her work has earned multiple Edward R. Murrow Awards, awards from the Associated Press and Public Media Journalists Association and the Public Service Journalism Award from The Society for Professional Journalists. Hanson is a proud alumnus of the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies.

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Apple cores are perfectly safe to eat, even though many choose not to. Cavan Images/Getty Images/Cavan Images RF hide caption

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Cavan Images/Getty Images/Cavan Images RF

Gitanjali Rao speaks onstage during The 2018 MAKERS Conference in Los Angeles, California. Rachel Murray/Getty Images for MAKERS hide caption

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Rachel Murray/Getty Images for MAKERS

This Teen Scientist Is TIME's First-Ever 'Kid Of The Year'

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Micro Wave: What Makes Curly Hair Curl?

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Health workers work in a lab at the Kawasaki City Institute for Public Health at the Kawasaki Innovation Gateway (KING) Skyfront in Kawasaki, Japan. David Mareui/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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David Mareui/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

A team of health care workers intubate a COVID-19 patient at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb. Taylor Wilson/Nebraska Medical Center hide caption

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Taylor Wilson/Nebraska Medical Center

Nebraska Doctor: 'Don't Call Us Heroes.' Dig Deep And Do Your Part

Like many states in the Midwest, Nebraska was somewhat spared during the early days of the pandemic. But now, the state has more cases per capita than any other in the country. We talk with two Omaha doctors who say this latest surge is exhausting health care workers, and one explains why she's tired of people calling health care workers heroes.

Nebraska Doctor: 'Don't Call Us Heroes.' Dig Deep And Do Your Part

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A boll buggy follows behind a cotton picker during harvest near Clarksdale, Mississippi. Eighty percent of this 1,000 acre farm is genetically modified Bt, Roundup Ready cotton. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Since its completion in 1963, the Arecibo Observatory has played a key role in discoveries ranging from new insights into pulsars to detecting planets outside our solar system. John Elk/Getty Images hide caption

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John Elk/Getty Images

The Long Legacy Of The Arecibo Telescope

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A health care worker holds an injection syringe of the phase 3 vaccine trial, developed against the novel coronavirus pandemic by the U.S. Pfizer and German BioNTech company, at the Ankara University Ibni Sina Hospital in Ankara, Turkey. Dogukan Keskinkilic/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Dogukan Keskinkilic/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Who Gets The Vaccine First? And How Will They Get It?

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An artist's rendering shows NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft descending toward the asteroid Bennu to collect a sample of the asteroid's surface. NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona hide caption

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NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona

Fallen whale carcasses, abundant in the deep sea, are now studied as ecosystems unto themselves. Craig Smith and Mike deGruy/Craig Smith and Mike deGruy hide caption

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Craig Smith and Mike deGruy/Craig Smith and Mike deGruy

After A Whale Dies, What Happens?

What happens after a whale dies? Their carcasses, known as "whale falls," provide a sudden, concentrated food source for organisms in the deep sea. Biologist Diva Amon is our guide through whale-fall ecosystems and the unique species that exist on these fallen whales. (Encore Episode.)

After A Whale Dies, What Happens?

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During deep sleep, waves of cerebrospinal fluid (blue) coincide with temporary decreases in blood flow (red). Less blood in the brain means more room for the fluid to carry away toxins, including those associated with Alzheimer's disease. Fultz et al. 2019 hide caption

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Fultz et al. 2019

One More Step Toward Solving The Sleep & Alzheimer's Puzzle

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