Brit Hanson Brit Hanson is a producer for NPR's science podcast, Short Wave.
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Brit Hanson

Brit Hanson
Headshot of Brit Hanson
Brit Hanson

Brit Hanson

Producer, Short Wave

Brit Hanson (she/her) is a producer for NPR's science podcast, Short Wave. The podcast explores new discoveries, everyday mysteries and the science behind the headlines — all in about 10 minutes. She's produced episodes ranging from why some fruit ripens faster in paper bag to the dangers of tear gas during a respiratory pandemic and the evolution of HIV treatment.

Prior to working at NPR, Hanson was a freelancer reporter and producer, an editor at St. Louis Public Radio and a reporter and producer at North Country Public Radio. Her work has earned multiple Edward R. Murrow Awards, awards from the Associated Press and Public Media Journalists Association and the Public Service Journalism Award from The Society for Professional Journalists. Hanson is a proud alumnus of the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies.

Story Archive

Monday

An artist's reconstruction of adult and newly born ichthyosaur, Shonisaurus popularis, which lived during the Triassic Period. Gabriel Ugueto / Smithsonian hide caption

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Gabriel Ugueto / Smithsonian

Fossil CSI: Cracking the case of an ancient reptile graveyard

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Friday

Closeup of a person's tears. RunPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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RunPhoto/Getty Images

Wednesday

A closer look at tears. Photographer Rose-Lynn Fisher spent eight years capturing tears through a microscope. This image, titled Go! is from her work The Topography of Tears, published by Bellevue Literary Press in 2017. Rose-Lynn Fisher hide caption

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Rose-Lynn Fisher

Why Do We Cry?

Last month, Short Wave explored the evolutionary purpose of laughter. Now, we're talking tears. From glistening eyeballs to waterworks, what are tears? Why do we shed them? And what makes our species' ability to cry emotional tears so unique?

Why Do We Cry?

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Monday

Tuesday

Baker Lake is surrounded by Fall colors on October 8, 2022 near East Bolton, Quebec, Canada. SEBASTIEN ST-JEAN / AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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SEBASTIEN ST-JEAN / AFP via Getty Images

When Autumn Leaves Start To Fall

Botanist and founder of #BlackBotanistsWeek Tanisha Williams explains why some leaves change color during fall and what shorter days and colder temperatures have to do with it. Plus, a bit of listener mail from you! (Encore)

When Autumn Leaves Start To Fall

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Tuesday

Part of a destroyed mobile home park is pictured in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian in Fort Myers Beach, Florida on September 30, 2022. GIORGIO VIERA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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GIORGIO VIERA/AFP via Getty Images

Monday

The brain processes music in several places, making it easier for some people to remember songs they learned a long time ago. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Name That Tune! Why The Brain Remembers Songs

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Tuesday

Ben Elliott gets barreled at the BSR Surf Resort, where artificial waves are attracting world-class talent. Rob Henson/BSR Surf Resort hide caption

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Rob Henson/BSR Surf Resort

Surf's Always Up — In Waco, Texas

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Friday

Prisma Bildagentur/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Thursday

Chemistry Week at Nottingham University. Nigel French - PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Nigel French - PA Images via Getty Images

Pride Week: How Organic Chemistry Helped With Embracing Identities

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Wednesday

Medical transition-related treatments like HRT are associated with positive physical and mental health outcomes. amtitus/Getty Images hide caption

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amtitus/Getty Images

Monday

Some of NASA's first female astronaut candidates take a break from training in Florida in 1978. From left: Sally Ride, Judith Resnik, Anna Fisher, Kathryn Sullivan, Rhea Seddon. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Thursday

Members of MISS work up a shark. Cliff Hawkins/Field School hide caption

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Cliff Hawkins/Field School

How Women Of Color Created Community In The Shark Sciences

As a kid, Jasmin Graham was endlessly curious about the ocean. That eventually led her to a career in marine science studying sharks and rays. But until relatively recently, she had never met another Black woman in her field.

How Women Of Color Created Community In The Shark Sciences

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Wednesday

Dr. Jasmine Marcelin has been involved with free community events in North Omaha to provide and address concerns about the COVID-19 vaccines. Taylor Wilson / Nebraska Medical Center hide caption

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Taylor Wilson / Nebraska Medical Center

Tuesday

Much of the movie 'Contact' was filmed at the Very Large Array in New Mexico. Erin Slonaker/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Slonaker/Moment Editorial/Getty Images