Carrie Feibel Carrie Feibel is a senior editor on NPR's Science Desk, focusing on health care.
Carrie Feibel, photographed for NPR, 19 September 2019, in Washington DC.
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Carrie Feibel

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Carrie Feibel, photographed for NPR, 19 September 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Carrie Feibel

Senior Editor, Science Desk

Carrie Feibel is a senior editor on NPR's Science Desk, focusing on health care. She runs the NPR side of a joint reporting partnership with Kaiser Health News, which includes 30 journalists based at public radio stations across the country.

Previously, Feibel was KQED's health editor in San Francisco and the health and science reporter at Houston Public Radio. She has covered abortion policy and politics, the Affordable Care Act, the medical risks of rodeo, the hippie roots of the country's first "free clinic" and the evolution of drug education in the age of legal weed.

Feibel graduated from Cornell University and has a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University. In her print career, she worked at The (Bergen) Record and the Herald News in New Jersey, the Houston Chronicle and the Associated Press. She is currently a board member of the Association of Health Care Journalists.

Feibel was part of the coverage of Hurricane Ike, for which the Houston Chronicle was named a Pulitzer Prize finalist. At KQED, she edited a half-hour radio show on U.S. refugee policy that won an award in explanatory journalism from the Society of Professional Journalists.

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Registered nurses and other health care workers at UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica, Calif., protest in April what they say was a lack of personal protective equipment for the pandemic's front-line workers. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, speaks at a House Committee on Oversight and Reform hearing about the coronavirus on March 11. Michael Brochstein/Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Brochstein/Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

CDC Director On Models For The Months To Come: 'This Virus Is Going To Be With Us'

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Local health workers across the U.S. have been reaching out to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for guidance on how to screen, manage and treat potential cases of coronavirus. Currently, testing for the virus must take place at the CDC. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Harris County Sheriff's Deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal was shot and killed after making a traffic stop on Friday near Houston. The suspected gunman was charged with capital murder in the slaying. Harris County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Harris County Sheriff's Office via AP

Sikh Deputy 'Trailblazer' Fatally Shot In Houston-Area Traffic Stop

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Americans Hold Complex Views On Abortion, Poll Finds

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Dawn Charlton, an instructor with Being Adept, leads a discussion on marijuana for sixth-graders at Del Mar Middle School in Tiburon, California. Carrie Feibel/KQED hide caption

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Carrie Feibel/KQED

With The Rise Of Legal Weed, Drug Education Moves From 'Don't' to 'Delay'

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ALS patients and their families rallied for expanded access to experimental drugs in Washington, D.C. on May 11, 2015. Courtesy of Lina Clark hide caption

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Courtesy of Lina Clark

Patients Demand The 'Right To Try' Experimental Drugs, But Costs Can Be Steep

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Medical residents training to be OB-GYNs in Texas don't have many places where they can learn how to perform abortions. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media

Can Doctors Learn To Perform Abortions Without Doing One?

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Dr. Bernard Rosenfeld, 74, has not been able to find a successor to lead his abortion practice in Houston. He says younger doctors don't want to deal with the politics and protesters. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media

Politics Makes Abortion Training In Texas Difficult

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Mosquitoes in traps are transported back to the county's laboratory for analysis. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media

Mosquito Hunters Set Traps Across Houston, Search for Signs of Zika

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Tracy Smith, 38, and her children Hazel, 8, and Finley, 5, at their home in Houston. Smith is pregnant with twins and says she's a little more worried than usual about the approach of mosquito season. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media

In Houston, Pregnant Women And Their Doctors Weigh Risks Of Zika

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Iris Galvez, a health insurance navigator (right) helps Mary Soliz of Houston, Texas, sign up for her first health plan through the Affordable Care Act on January 28, 2015 at a Houston community center. Courtesy of Iris Galvez hide caption

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Courtesy of Iris Galvez

Feds Hopeful Hispanics Will Respond As Open Enrollment Comes To A Close

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