Carrie Feibel Carrie Feibel is a senior editor on NPR's Science Desk, focusing on health care.
Carrie Feibel, photographed for NPR, 19 September 2019, in Washington DC.
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Carrie Feibel

Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee (right) tours a temporary hospital site in April with his wife, Maria Lee. The overflow hospital, intended to help with the surge in COVID-19 hospitalizations, won't be able to take patients if there aren't additional doctors and nurses available to provide treatment. Theresa Montgomery/TN Photo Services hide caption

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Theresa Montgomery/TN Photo Services

As Hospitals Fill With COVID-19 Patients, Medical Reinforcements Are Hard To Find

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Registered nurses and other health care workers at UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica, Calif., protest in April what they say was a lack of personal protective equipment for the pandemic's front-line workers. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, speaks at a House Committee on Oversight and Reform hearing about the coronavirus on March 11. Michael Brochstein/Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Brochstein/Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

CDC Director On Models For The Months To Come: 'This Virus Is Going To Be With Us'

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Local health workers across the U.S. have been reaching out to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for guidance on how to screen, manage and treat potential cases of coronavirus. Currently, testing for the virus must take place at the CDC. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Harris County Sheriff's Deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal was shot and killed after making a traffic stop on Friday near Houston. The suspected gunman was charged with capital murder in the slaying. Harris County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Harris County Sheriff's Office via AP

Sikh Deputy 'Trailblazer' Fatally Shot In Houston-Area Traffic Stop

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Americans Hold Complex Views On Abortion, Poll Finds

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Dawn Charlton, an instructor with Being Adept, leads a discussion on marijuana for sixth-graders at Del Mar Middle School in Tiburon, California. Carrie Feibel/KQED hide caption

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Carrie Feibel/KQED

With The Rise Of Legal Weed, Drug Education Moves From 'Don't' to 'Delay'

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Inside the Haight Ashbury Free Medical Clinic in its earliest days. The clinic opened on June 7, 1967, and treated 250 patients that day. It's motto, then and now: "Health care is a right, not a privilege." Courtesy of Gene Anthony/David Smith Archives hide caption

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Courtesy of Gene Anthony/David Smith Archives

A 1960s 'Hippie Clinic' In San Francisco Inspired A Medical Philosophy

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ALS patients and their families rallied for expanded access to experimental drugs in Washington, D.C. on May 11, 2015. Courtesy of Lina Clark hide caption

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Courtesy of Lina Clark

Patients Demand The 'Right To Try' Experimental Drugs, But Costs Can Be Steep

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Medical residents training to be OB-GYNs in Texas don't have many places where they can learn how to perform abortions. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media

Can Doctors Learn To Perform Abortions Without Doing One?

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Dr. Bernard Rosenfeld, 74, has not been able to find a successor to lead his abortion practice in Houston. He says younger doctors don't want to deal with the politics and protesters. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media

Politics Makes Abortion Training In Texas Difficult

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Mosquitoes in traps are transported back to the county's laboratory for analysis. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media

Mosquito Hunters Set Traps Across Houston, Search for Signs of Zika

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