Carrie Feibel Carrie Feibel is a senior editor on NPR's Science Desk, focusing on health care.
Carrie Feibel, photographed for NPR, 19 September 2019, in Washington DC.
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Carrie Feibel

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Carrie Feibel, photographed for NPR, 19 September 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Carrie Feibel

Senior Editor, Science Desk

Carrie Feibel is a senior editor on NPR's Science Desk, focusing on health care. She runs the NPR side of a joint reporting partnership with Kaiser Health News, which includes 30 journalists based at public radio stations across the country.

Previously, Feibel was KQED's health editor in San Francisco and the health and science reporter at Houston Public Radio. She has covered abortion policy and politics, the Affordable Care Act, the medical risks of rodeo, the hippie roots of the country's first "free clinic" and the evolution of drug education in the age of legal weed.

Feibel graduated from Cornell University and has a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University. In her print career, she worked at The (Bergen) Record and the Herald News in New Jersey, the Houston Chronicle and the Associated Press. She is currently a board member of the Association of Health Care Journalists.

Feibel was part of the coverage of Hurricane Ike, for which the Houston Chronicle was named a Pulitzer Prize finalist. At KQED, she edited a half-hour radio show on U.S. refugee policy that won an award in explanatory journalism from the Society of Professional Journalists.

Story Archive

Elizabeth and James Weller at their home in Houston two months after losing their baby due to a premature rupture of membranes. Elizabeth could not receive the medical care she needed until several days later because of a Texas law that banned abortion after six weeks. Julia Robinson/NPR hide caption

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Julia Robinson/NPR

Abortion Laws in Texas are Disrupting Maternal Care

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Elizabeth and James Weller at their home in Houston two months after losing their baby girl due to a premature rupture of membranes. Elizabeth could not receive the medical care she needed until several days later because of a Texas law that banned abortion after six weeks. Julia Robinson for NPR hide caption

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Julia Robinson for NPR

Because of Texas abortion law, her wanted pregnancy became a medical nightmare

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Mifepristone (Mifeprex) and Misoprostol, the two drugs used in a medication abortion, can also be prescribed for other medical uses. However some pharmacists have refused to fill prescriptions for them. ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images

US President Joe Biden receives a second booster shot of the Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine a day after the US authorized a fourth dose of either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna Covid-19 vaccines for people 50 and older NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP via Getty Images

A medical worker puts on a mask before entering a negative pressure room with a COVID-19 patient in the ICU ward at UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester, Mass., last week. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

The term "fetal heartbeat," as used in the anti-abortion law in Texas, is misleading and not based on science, say physicians who specialize in reproductive health. What the ultrasound machine detects in an embryo at six weeks of pregnancy is actually just electrical activity from cells that aren't yet a heart. And the sound that you "hear" is actually manufactured by the ultrasound machine. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

The Texas Abortion Ban Hinges On 'Fetal Heartbeat.' Doctors Call That Misleading

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Sick patients were isolated in converted warehouses during the 1918-19 global influenza pandemic, which killed an estimated 50 million worldwide. Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty

The U.S. 'Battles' Coronavirus, But Is It Fair To Compare Pandemic To A War?

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Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee (right) tours a temporary hospital site in April with his wife, Maria Lee. The overflow hospital, intended to help with the surge in COVID-19 hospitalizations, won't be able to take patients if there aren't additional doctors and nurses available to provide treatment. Theresa Montgomery/TN Photo Services hide caption

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Theresa Montgomery/TN Photo Services

As Hospitals Fill With COVID-19 Patients, Medical Reinforcements Are Hard To Find

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Registered nurses and other health care workers at UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica, Calif., protest in April what they say was a lack of personal protective equipment for the pandemic's front-line workers. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, speaks at a House Committee on Oversight and Reform hearing about the coronavirus on March 11. Michael Brochstein/Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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CDC Director On Models For The Months To Come: 'This Virus Is Going To Be With Us'

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Local health workers across the U.S. have been reaching out to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for guidance on how to screen, manage and treat potential cases of coronavirus. Currently, testing for the virus must take place at the CDC. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Harris County Sheriff's Deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal was shot and killed after making a traffic stop on Friday near Houston. The suspected gunman was charged with capital murder in the slaying. Harris County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Harris County Sheriff's Office via AP

Sikh Deputy 'Trailblazer' Fatally Shot In Houston-Area Traffic Stop

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