Raina Douris
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Raina Douris

Puss N Boots Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist

Puss N Boots on World Cafe

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Clairo outside the World Cafe Performance studio at WXPN in Philadelphia. Galea McGregor/WXPN hide caption

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Galea McGregor/WXPN

How Clairo Turned A Viral Bedroom Video Into A Successful Music Career

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Michael Kiwanuka went to music school, but he thinks technical knowledge is less important than passion and free expression. Olivia Rose/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Olivia Rose/Courtesy of the artist

Michael Kiwanuka On World Cafe

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Tom Petty's "I Won't Back Down" is one of Jeff Lynne's favorite songs to have co-written. Joseph Cultice/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Joseph Cultice/Courtesy of the artist

Jeff Lynne On World Cafe

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"They were very musical and they made great songs and had great harmonies," Chrissie Hynde says of The Beach Boys. "I only didn't appreciate them then because I was tripping my brains out and listening to Jimi Hendrix." Jill Furmanovsky/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jill Furmanovsky/Courtesy of the artist

Chrissie Hynde On World Cafe

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Pete Townshend originally wrote the songs on The Who's new album for Roger Daltrey as a solo artist. "I wrote them for Roger because I knew that Roger would sing them best," he says. William Snyder/Courtesy of the aritst hide caption

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William Snyder/Courtesy of the aritst

Pete Townshend On World Cafe

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