Rachel Treisman Rachel Treisman is a writer and editor for the Morning Edition live blog.
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Rachel Treisman

Rachel Treisman

Associate Editor/Social Media & Digital Writer, Morning Edition

Rachel Treisman (she/her) is a writer and editor for the Morning Edition live blog, which she helped launch in early 2021.

Treisman has worn many digital hats since arriving at NPR as a National Desk intern in 2019. She's written hundreds of breaking news and feature stories, which are often among NPR's most-read pieces of the day.

She writes multiple stories a day, covering a wide range of topics both global and domestic, including politics, science, health, education, culture and consumer safety. She's also reported for the hourly newscast, curated radio content for the NPR One app, contributed to the daily and coronavirus newsletters, live-blogged 2020 election events and spent the first six months of the coronavirus pandemic tracking every state's restrictions and reopenings.

Treisman previously covered business at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and evaluated the credibility of digital news sites for the startup NewsGuard Technologies, which aims to fight misinformation and promote media literacy. She is a graduate of Yale University, where she studied American history and served as editor in chief of the Yale Daily News.

Story Archive

Friday

U.S. second gentleman, Doug Emhoff, lays a wreath honoring Holocaust victims at the former Auschwitz site on Friday in Oswiecim, Poland. Omar Marques/Getty Images hide caption

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Omar Marques/Getty Images

People attend a candlelight vigil in memory of Tyre Nichols on Thursday at the Tobey Skate Park in Memphis, Tenn. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

There's no way to prepare for the Tyre Nichols video, a Memphis pastor says

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Thursday

Gel nail polish is popular for its durability, but needs to dry under a UV light. A new study raises questions about the potential health risks of those devices. StockPlanets/Getty Images hide caption

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StockPlanets/Getty Images

Tuesday

Penny Harrison and her son Parker Harrison rally outside the U.S. Capitol during the Senate Judiciary Committee's Ticketmaster hearing on Tuesday morning. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Senate's Ticketmaster hearing featured plenty of Taylor Swift puns and protesters

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Monday

"People across the country should be concerned that legislators and governors across the country are going to do exactly what Florida is doing," says Florida Sen. Shevrin Jones, pictured here in March 2022. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Florida's AP African American studies ban should raise alarm elsewhere, lawmaker says

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Thursday

A Thinx billboard is pictured in New York City in September 2021. The company is accused of misleading consumers about the safety of its period underwear, but denies all allegations and admits no wrongdoing. Eugene Gologursky/Getty Images for Thinx hide caption

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Eugene Gologursky/Getty Images for Thinx

Wednesday

In this image taken from video, former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin addresses the court at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis in 2021. An attorney for Chauvin asked an appeals court on Wednesday to throw out his convictions in the murder of George Floyd, arguing that numerous legal and procedural errors deprived him of his right to a fair trial. Court TV/AP hide caption

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Court TV/AP

Tuesday

A mural in Washington, D.C. depicts Americans Siamak Namazi (left), who remains in Iran, and Jose Angel Pereira, who was released from Venezuela in October. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

American Siamak Namazi is on a hunger strike in Iranian prison. Why now and for what?

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Friday

The Missouri State Capitol in Jefferson City, Mo., pictured in Sept. 2022. The Republican-controlled House began its new session by strengthening its dress code for women. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Thursday

Retired NFL player Ryan Shazier, pictured in 2018, relearned how to walk after suffering a spinal cord injury during a 2017 game. Justin K. Aller/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin K. Aller/Getty Images

Ryan Shazier was seriously injured in an NFL game. He has advice for Damar Hamlin

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Wednesday

Travelers wait in the terminal as an Alaska Airlines plane sits at a gate at Los Angeles International Airport early Wednesday. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Nurses hold signs outside Manhattan's Mount Sinai Hospital on Monday, the first day of their strike. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

NYC nurses are on strike, but the problems they face are seen nationwide

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Tuesday

Lynnette Hardaway, left, and Rochelle Richardson, known as Diamond and Silk, speak at a Trump campaign rally in Tulsa, Okla., in June 2020. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

There are steps you can take to reduce food waste while prepping, shopping and cooking. Yuki Iwamura/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yuki Iwamura/AFP via Getty Images

Food waste is a big problem. These small changes can help

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