Rachel Treisman Rachel Treisman is an editor on NPR's digital news desk.
Stories By

Rachel Treisman

Rachel Treisman

Editor, Digital

Rachel Treisman (she/her) is an editor on NPR's digital news desk, where she reports news of the day and leads the network's live blogs, helping shape digital coverage of breaking stories and political events. She also writes in-depth features and reports for broadcast, including the hourly newscast.

She has written hundreds of high-performing breaking news and feature stories across a wide range of topics, with a special focus on politics and pop culture. She joins the Newshub from Morning Edition, where she reported news and feature stories for both digital and radio platforms, traveling to London for Queen Elizabeth's funeral and Michigan for its 2024 primary.

Treisman has worn many hats since arriving at NPR as a National Desk intern in 2019, including writing for NPR's flagship Up First newsletter, running Morning Edition's social media accounts, curating radio content for the NPR One app, live blogging multiple election cycles and tracking every state's restrictions and reopenings during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Treisman previously covered business at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and evaluated the credibility of digital news sites for the startup NewsGuard Technologies, which aims to fight misinformation and promote media literacy. She is a graduate of Yale University, where she studied American history and served as editor in chief of the Yale Daily News.

Story Archive

Thursday

Colin Kaepernick (L) and Harrison Butker (R). Noam Galai/Getty Images for The Gordon Parks Foundation and Jamie Squire/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Noam Galai/Getty Images for The Gordon Parks Foundation and Jamie Squire/Getty Images

Robert Hale gives an envelope with cash to a graduating UMass Dartmouth student at last week's commencement. Each of the 1,200 graduates received $1,000 onstage, half to keep and half to donate. Karl Christoff Dominey/University of Massachusetts Dartmouth hide caption

toggle caption
Karl Christoff Dominey/University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

Tuesday

Monday

In this photo released by the Iranian first vice president's office, Iranian First Vice President Mohammad Mokhber, right, now acting President of the Islamic Republic of Iran, leads a cabinet meeting in Tehran on Monday. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Thursday

Kansas City Chiefs player Harrison Butker, pictured at a press conference in February, is in hot water for his recent commencement speech at Benedictine College in Kansas. Chris Unger/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Unger/Getty Images

Tuesday

Noelia Voigt (L) and UmaSofia Srivastava (R) attend a charity event in New York City on May 8, the week that they stepped down as Miss USA and Miss Teen USA. Rob Kim/Getty Images for Smile Train hide caption

toggle caption
Rob Kim/Getty Images for Smile Train

Delegates from New York demonstrate in favor of the anti-war plank at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago on Aug. 28, 1968. Anonymous/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Anonymous/AP

Anti-war protests, a Chicago DNC: Is it 1968 all over again? Some historians say no

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1250917132/1251670526" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

Miss Teen USA, UmaSofia Srivastava, left, and Miss USA, Noelia Voigt pictured at a New York Fashion Week event in February. They both announced their resignations this week. Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Supermodels Unlimited hide caption

toggle caption
Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Supermodels Unlimited

Wednesday

Virginia Rep. Jennifer Wexton used text-to-speech technology to advocate for her bill on the House floor Monday, following her diagnosis with the rare brain condition known as progressive supranuclear palsy. C-SPAN/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
C-SPAN/Screenshot by NPR

Tuesday

Squares mark a lawn where tents once stood at Brown University in Providence, R.I. It's one of several schools where administrators have struck deals with student protesters. David Goldman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Goldman/AP

Katy Perry pictured at an event in Los Angeles in April. She wasn't at Monday night's Met Gala, despite the fake photos of her circulating on social media. Jordan Strauss/Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jordan Strauss/Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

Monday

Protesters seen in tents on Columbia University's campus on April 24. The school later suspended protesters who didn't leave, and called New York City police to arrest those who occupied a building on campus. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Saturday

Ohio National Guard members move toward students at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, on May 4, 1970. They fired into the crowd, killing four students and injuring nine. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Friday

Joie Henney says his emotional support alligator, Wally, is missing in Georgia after being kidnapped, found and released into a swamp with some 20 other gators. Heather Khalifa/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Heather Khalifa/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP

Wednesday

Columbia University faculty and staff gather on the campus in solidarity with student protesters on Monday. Stefan Jeremiah/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Stefan Jeremiah/AP

How some faculty members are defending student protesters, in actions and in words

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1248099600/1249072754" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

Dozens of tents are seen on a lawn inside the Columbia University Campus after students refused to take down the encampment by the 2 p.m. EDT deadline given to students protesting by Columbia President Minouche Shafik. Luiz C. Ribeiro/Tribune News Service/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Luiz C. Ribeiro/Tribune News Service/Getty Images

Friday

Activists and students participate in an encampment protest at the University Yard at George Washington University on Thursday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Thursday

From left, Nile Rodgers, Chappell Roan and Diplo are among the more than 280 musicians who signed a letter to senators in support of concert ticketing reforms. Michael Loccisano/Getty Images; Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images; Leon Bennett/Getty Images for MBJx David Yurman hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Loccisano/Getty Images; Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images; Leon Bennett/Getty Images for MBJx David Yurman

Georgia State Patrol officers detain a demonstrator on the campus of Emory University in Atlanta during a pro-Palestinian demonstration on Thursday. Mike Stewart/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Stewart/AP

Wednesday

Tuesday

Monday

Caitlin Clark, pictured autographing sneakers before the WNBA draft last Monday, is helping drive demand for the league's ticket sales and TV coverage. Adam Hunger/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Adam Hunger/AP

Friday

Iranian worshippers walk past a mural showing the late revolutionary founder Ayatollah Khomeini, right, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, left, and Basij paramilitary force, in an anti-Israeli gathering after their Friday prayer in Tehran, Iran, on Friday. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Vahid Salemi/AP

The CDC and FDA are investigating reports of patients in nearly a dozen U.S. states being injected with counterfeit Botox. Jens Kalaene/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jens Kalaene/picture alliance via Getty Images