Rachel Treisman Rachel Treisman is a writer and editor for the Morning Edition live blog.
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Rachel Treisman

Rachel Treisman

Associate Editor/Social Media & Digital Writer, Morning Edition

Rachel Treisman (she/her) is a writer and editor for the Morning Edition live blog, which she helped launch in early 2021.

Treisman has worn many digital hats since arriving at NPR as a National Desk intern in 2019. She's written hundreds of breaking news and feature stories, which are often among NPR's most-read pieces of the day.

She writes multiple stories a day, covering a wide range of topics both global and domestic, including politics, science, health, education, culture and consumer safety. She's also reported for the hourly newscast, curated radio content for the NPR One app, contributed to the daily and coronavirus newsletters, live-blogged 2020 election events and spent the first six months of the coronavirus pandemic tracking every state's restrictions and reopenings.

Treisman previously covered business at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and evaluated the credibility of digital news sites for the startup NewsGuard Technologies, which aims to fight misinformation and promote media literacy. She is a graduate of Yale University, where she studied American history and served as editor in chief of the Yale Daily News.

Story Archive

Former president of Afghanistan Hamid Karzai says the Taliban have to correct their mistakes in the country, as does the United States. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Hamid Karzai stays on in Afghanistan — hoping for the best, but unable to leave

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President Biden speaks from the White House balcony on Monday, announcing that a U.S. drone strike killed al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahiri over the weekend. Jim Watson/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/Pool/Getty Images

What Biden's low approval ratings and high-profile wins could mean for the midterms

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Brittney Griner holds a picture of her Russian basketball team as she stands inside a defendants' cage before a court hearing in Khimki, outside Moscow, on Thursday. Evgenia Novozhenina/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Evgenia Novozhenina/AFP via Getty Images

Osama bin Laden (left) sits with his No. 2, Ayman al-Zawahiri, for an interview that was published in November 2001, shortly after the 9/11 attacks. The U.S. says it killed al-Zawahiri in a drone strike in Kabul on Sunday. Visual News/Getty Images hide caption

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Visual News/Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and others attend a news conference on Capitol Hill on Thursday, the day after Senate Republicans blocked a procedural vote to advance PACT Act. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Senate passed a bill to help sick veterans. Then 25 Republicans reversed course

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Boyd Holbrook (left) as Ty Shaw and B.J. Novak as Ben Manalowitz are pictured in a still from the movie Vengeance, which marks Novak's directorial debut. Patti Perret /Focus Features hide caption

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Patti Perret /Focus Features

B.J. Novak learned a lot about himself — and Texas — while working on 'Vengeance'

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A guard removes Brittney Griner's handcuffs ahead of a hearing at the Khimki Court outside Moscow on Wednesday. Alexander Zemlianichenko /Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko /Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Brittney Griner testifies about her medical marijuana prescription and chaotic arrest

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Sen. Tammy Baldwin speaks at a May press conference in Washington, D.C. Congressional Democrats are working to codify same-sex marriage and other rights that they fear are at risk following the Supreme Court's ruling on Roe v. Wade. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Democrats' push to protect same-sex marriage is personal for Sen. Tammy Baldwin

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Members of the Ukrainian band Kalush Orchestra pose onstage after winning the Eurovision Song Contest on May 14 in Turin, Italy. The winning country typically hosts the next year's competition, but Russia's war in Ukraine has disrupted that tradition. Marco Bertorello/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Marco Bertorello/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen attends a meeting in Seoul, South Korea on Tuesday. She spoke to Morning Edition about some of the initiatives she's been promoting on her trip overseas. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Yellen believes U.S. will get on board with global minimum corporate tax — eventually

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Falcolner Ricky Ortiz poses with Pac-Man, a Harris's hawk, at the El Cerrito del Norte BART station in El Cerrito, Calif. Raquel Maria Dillon/NPR hide caption

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Raquel Maria Dillon/NPR

The key to this California train station's pigeon problem? A hawk named Pac-Man

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