Rachel Treisman Rachel Treisman is a writer and editor for the Morning Edition live blog.
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Rachel Treisman

Rachel Treisman

Associate Editor/Social Media & Digital Writer, Morning Edition

Rachel Treisman (she/her) is a writer and editor for the Morning Edition live blog, which she helped launch in early 2021.

Treisman has worn many digital hats since arriving at NPR as a National Desk intern in 2019. She's written hundreds of breaking news and feature stories, which are often among NPR's most-read pieces of the day.

She writes multiple stories a day, covering a wide range of topics both global and domestic, including politics, science, health, education, culture and consumer safety. She's also reported for the hourly newscast, curated radio content for the NPR One app, contributed to the daily and coronavirus newsletters, live-blogged 2020 election events and spent the first six months of the coronavirus pandemic tracking every state's restrictions and reopenings.

Treisman previously covered business at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and evaluated the credibility of digital news sites for the startup NewsGuard Technologies, which aims to fight misinformation and promote media literacy. She is a graduate of Yale University, where she studied American history and served as editor in chief of the Yale Daily News.

Story Archive

Geena Davis attends the Emmy Awards in Sept. 2022. This month, she spoke with NPR's Morning Edition about her movie career and upcoming memoir. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

These are the life lessons Geena Davis learned from 3 of her most famous movies

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The Onion head writer Mike Gillis submitted an amicus brief to the U.S. Supreme Court this week. He says he hopes it will convince the court to take up an Ohio man's First Amendment case while educating the broader public. Mike Gillis hide caption

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Mike Gillis

The Karsto gas processing plant in the municipality of Tysvær, Norway — which said it will increase security around its oil installations after the Nord Stream pipeline leaks. Cornelius Poppe/NTB/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Cornelius Poppe/NTB/AFP via Getty Images

The Nord Stream leaks are a wake-up call for countries with vulnerable pipelines

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In this aerial photo taken in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian on Thursday, parts of the Sanibel Causeway are washed away along with sections of the bridge. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Lizzo plays President James Madison's crystal flute in the flute vault at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. on Sept. 26, 2022. Shawn Miller/Library of Congress hide caption

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Shawn Miller/Library of Congress

This is the last complete image of Dimorphos taken by the DRACO imager on NASA's DART mission before the collision. It shows a patch of the asteroid about 100 feet across, captured from some 7 miles away and two seconds before impact. NASA/Johns Hopkins APL hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins APL

People board up a restaurant in preparation for Hurricane Ian on Monday in St. Petersburg, Fla. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Floridians in the hurricane's path don't need to go far to get to safety, mayors say

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The Library of Congress has acquired the life's work of radio producer Jim Metzner, who has spent decades traveling the world to capture rich soundscapes. While he's honored that they will be archived, he says he wants to make sure people actually listen to them. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

He spent decades recording soundscapes. Now they're going to the Library of Congress

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Mourners photograph the funeral procession as they gather to say goodbye to Queen Elizabeth II outside the Palace of Westminster and the houses of Parliament in London on Monday. The final leg of Monday's journey for Queen Elizabeth II, who served as the constitutional monarch of the United Kingdom for 70 years, follows a state funeral at Westminster Abbey and a procession through the city. Elizabeth Dalziel for NPR hide caption

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Elizabeth Dalziel for NPR

Anjelo Disons poses for a picture after speaking about his views on the recent events surrounding the queen's death and the monarchy at the Peckham Festival in London. Elizabeth Dalziel for NPR hide caption

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Elizabeth Dalziel for NPR