Emily Vaughn
Emily Vaughn
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Emily Vaughn

Story Archive

Psychologist Ken Carter studies why some people seek out haunted houses and other thrills — even though he's not one of them. Kay Hinton/Emory University hide caption

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Kay Hinton/Emory University

The Science Of Scary: Why It's So Fun To Be Freaked Out

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In a new book of essays, literary luminaries share stories of surviving dark times and the foods tied to those memories. Think of it as a cathartic dinner party. Meryl Rowin hide caption

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Meryl Rowin

Addario's coverage of maternal mortality took her to a remote village in Badakhshan province, Afghanistan in 2009, where she photographed a midwife giving a prenatal check in a private home. "In these areas someone will announce that a doctor and a midwife are coming, and any pregnant and lactating women within a certain radius come if they want prenatal or postnatal care," she says. Lynsey Addario hide caption

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Lynsey Addario

A recent study looked at funding rates for R01 grant applications, which are designed to support "health-related research and development based on the mission of the NIH." In general, population-based projects were less likely to be funded than explorations of cellular mechanisms, the study found. Will & Deni McIntyre/Science Source hide caption

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Will & Deni McIntyre/Science Source

A selection of small feeding vessels dating back to the late Bronze Age and early Iron Age. Researchers now say vessels like these were used as prehistoric baby bottles. Katharina Rebay-Salisbury hide caption

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Katharina Rebay-Salisbury