Viet Le Viet Le is a senior producer at The Indicator from Planet Money, NPR's daily economics podcast.
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Viet Le

Viet Le

Senior Producer, The Indicator from Planet Money

Viet Le (he/him) is a senior producer at The Indicator from Planet Money, NPR's daily economics podcast. Before that, he edited and helped launch NPR's daily science podcast, Short Wave. His career at NPR started at All Things Considered in 2008, first as a booker and then producer. He also spent a couple of years helping to get NPR One off the ground, and worked as an editor on Weekend Edition. But no matter what his professional accomplishments at the network, he will perhaps be most remembered in the newsroom for convincing a Virginia farmer to put lipstick on one of his pigs for an ATC segment.

Story Archive

Friday

An artistic rendering of a washed-up Ichthyotitan severnensis carcass on the beach. Sergey Krasovskiy hide caption

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Sergey Krasovskiy

Friday

A post-reproductive toothed whale mother and her son. David Ellifrit/Center for Whale Research hide caption

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David Ellifrit/Center for Whale Research

Most animals don't go through menopause. So why do these whales?

Across the animal kingdom, menopause is something of an evolutionary blip. We humans are one of the few animals to experience it. But Sam Ellis, a researcher in animal behavior, argues that this isn't so surprising. "The best way to propagate your genes is to get as many offspring as possible into the next generation," says Ellis. "The best way to do that is almost always to reproduce your whole life."

Most animals don't go through menopause. So why do these whales?

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Friday

Gabriel Bouys/AFP via Getty Images

Clownfish might be counting their potential enemies' stripes

At least, that's what a group of researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University thinks. The team recently published a study in the journal Experimental Biology suggesting that Amphiphrion ocellaris, or clown anemonefish, may be counting. Specifically, the authors think the fish may be looking at the number of vertical white stripes on each other as well as other anemonefish as a way to identify their own species. Not only that — the researchers think that the fish are noticing the minutiae of other anemonefish's looks because of some fishy marine geopolitics.

Clownfish might be counting their potential enemies' stripes

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Friday

A recent study published in the journal iScience found that the diversity of animals emojis more than doubled from 2015 to 2022, but notes that there is still unequal representation of organisms among emojis. Stefano Mammola, Mattia Falaschi, Gentile Francesco Ficetola hide caption

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Stefano Mammola, Mattia Falaschi, Gentile Francesco Ficetola

More nature emojis could be better for biodiversity

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Thursday

This week in science: dunking birds, a hole in the sun and lack of emoji biodiversity

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Friday

Wednesday

Indicator exploder: jobs and inflation

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Friday

Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

What to know about the link between air pollution and superbugs

Today on the show, All Things Considered co-host Ari Shapiro joins Aaron Scott and Regina G. Barber for our science roundup. They talk about how antibiotic resistance may spread through particulate air pollution, magnetically halted black holes and how diversified farms are boosting biodiversity in Costa Rica.

What to know about the link between air pollution and superbugs

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Monday

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Friday

Journalists film the live telecast of spacecraft Chandrayaan-3 landing on the moon at ISRO's Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network facility in Bengaluru, India, Wednesday, Aug. 23, 2023. Aijaz Rahi/AP hide caption

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Aijaz Rahi/AP

Friday

Damselfish didn't detect a threat when the two models of a trumpetfish and a parrotfish passed by together. Sam Matchette hide caption

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Sam Matchette

Trumpetfish: The fish that conceal themselves to hunt

All Things Considered host Juana Summers joins Regina G. Barber and Berly McCoy to nerd-out on some of the latest science news buzzing around in our brains. They talk NASA shouting across billions of miles of space to reconnect with Voyager 2, the sneaky tactics trumpetfish use to catch their prey and how climate change is fueling big waves along California's coast.

Trumpetfish: The fish that conceal themselves to hunt

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Monday

Mario Suriani/Associated Press

Tuesday

Ryan J. Lane/Getty Images

The Indicator Quiz: Jobs and Employment

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Friday

ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images

Wednesday

ROMAN ROMOKHOV/AFP via Getty Images

Monday

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Why building public transit in the US costs so much

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Monday

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Monday

No, it's not The Price is Right, but The Indicator Quiz! Tommaso Boddi/Getty Images for Vulture hide caption

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Tommaso Boddi/Getty Images for Vulture

The Indicator Quiz: Banking Troubles

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Friday

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Household debt, Home Depot sales and Montana's TikTok ban

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Wednesday

Professor Robert Lucas (left) receiving the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1995. Lucas died earlier this week at age 85. Jack Mikrut/Scanpix Sweden / AFP via Getty Ima hide caption

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Jack Mikrut/Scanpix Sweden / AFP via Getty Ima

Monday

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Wednesday

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Monday

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Friday

Kaz Fantone/NPR

Our final thoughts on the influencer industry

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