Rebecca Ramirez Rebecca Ramirez is the founding producer of NPR's daily science podcast, Short Wave.
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Rebecca Ramirez

Rebecca Ramirez

Associate Producer, Short Wave

Rebecca Ramirez (she/her) is the founding producer of NPR's daily science podcast, Short Wave. It's a meditation in how to be a Swiss Army Knife, in that it involves a little of everything — background research, finding and booking sources, interviewing guests, writing, cutting the tape, editing, scoring ... you get the idea.

Ramirez's journey to radio producer was a happy accident. At the University of Southern California, she pursued a double major in history and neuroscience. It was fun and engaging, but with no obvious career path. She answered an ad for an internship while playing an NPR podcast, and got hired! After graduation, she began an internship for Invisibilia, NPR's podcast about the unseeable forces that control human behavior. From there, she dove head-first into a completely different job - producing daily news on Morning Edition, NPR's daily morning news magazine. After a year, she jumped at the chance to help start a new NPR podcast. Aside from the joy of the hard work, Ramirez is involved in increasing NPR's diversity, both in its journalism through source diversity efforts and on staff as a leader of the Marginialized Genders and Intersex People of Color (MGIPOC) Mentorship Program.

Ramirez hails from Florida and lives in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

Patricia Neves (left) and Ana Paula Ano Bom helped launch a global project to revolutionize access to mRNA technology. Ian Cheibub for NPR hide caption

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Ian Cheibub for NPR

In this 30 second exposure, a meteor streaks across the sky during the annual Perseid meteor shower, Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2021, in Spruce Knob, West Virginia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls) NASA/Bill Ingalls/(NASA/Bill Ingalls) hide caption

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NASA/Bill Ingalls/(NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Twinkle, Twinkle, Shooting Star

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A researcher holds a Northern long eared bat in Shenandoah National Park in Virginia. Nick Kalen / Virginia Tech hide caption

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Nick Kalen / Virginia Tech

A Tale Of Two Parks And The Bats Within Them

Buckle up! Short Wave is going on a road trip every Friday this summer. In this first episode of our series on the research happening in the National Parks System, we head to Shenandoah National Park and the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. Some bats there are faring better than others against white-nose syndrome, a fungus that has killed more than 7 million bats in the last decade. Today — what researchers like Jesse De La Cruz think is enabling some bat species to survive.

A Tale Of Two Parks And The Bats Within Them

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A band of wild horses on a mountainside near the Soda Mountain Wilderness area. Photo Courtesy of: Wild Horse Fire Brigade - a non-profit organization hide caption

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Photo Courtesy of: Wild Horse Fire Brigade - a non-profit organization

Wild Horses Could Keep Wildfire At Bay

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Computer graphics of a pink human brain looking forward to a plate with doughnuts. OsakaWayne Studios/Getty Images hide caption

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TASTE BUDDIES: No Sugarcoating How Sweet Affects The Brain

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Natural, organic, sea, white salt, poured from a fallen salt shaker, on a black table or background. The concept of cooking healthy food, cosmetology. Aleksandr Zubkov/Getty Images hide caption

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TASTE BUDDIES: Pucker Up! It's The Science Of Sour

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Yevgeniy Medvedovskiy, the chief of the Zhytomyr region's department of ecological inspection, walks around the site of the jet crash picking up shards of metal and looking at the fallen trees. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Russia's War In Ukraine Is Hurting Nature

The war in Ukraine is devastating that nation's rich, natural environment - from chemical leaks poisoning water supplies and warships killing dolphins to explosions disrupting bird migrations. NPR Environmental Correspondent Nate Rott has been reporting from Ukraine. He sits down with Short Wave's Scientist in Residence Regina G. Barber to talk about how the Russian invasion is harming the environment even beyond Ukraine's borders.

Russia's War In Ukraine Is Hurting Nature

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In this composite image provided by NASA, the SDO satellite captures the path sequence of the transit of Venus across the face of the sun on June 5-6, 2012 as seen from space. The next pair of events will not happen again until the year 2117 and 2125. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA/Getty Images

Venus And The 18th Century Space Race

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On Wednesday, May 4th, 2022 a mix of masked and unmasked individuals shop at the Portland Farmers Market in Shemanski Park in Portland, OR. Leah Nash/The Washington Post / Getty Images hide caption

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Leah Nash/The Washington Post / Getty Images

BA.5: The Omicron Subvariant Driving Up Cases — And Reinfections

BA.5 is now the dominant SARS-CoV-2 subvariant in the United States. It's driving up COVID cases and hospitalizations across the country.

BA.5: The Omicron Subvariant Driving Up Cases — And Reinfections

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Brachycephalus ephippium. Pumpkin toadlets are native to neotropical rainforests along the Atlantic coast of southeastern Brazil. Walter StaebleinGetty Images hide caption

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Walter StaebleinGetty Images

Against All Odds, The Pumpkin Toadlet Is

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Jurassic World Dominion is the sixth and reportedly final film in the Jurassic film franchise. Universal Pictures hide caption

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Universal Pictures

On May 3, 2022, a partnership led by the Yurok Tribe released two California condors, called A2 and A3, into the wild as part of a decades-long conservation effort." Matt Mais/Yurok Tribe hide caption

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Matt Mais/Yurok Tribe

The Quest To Save The California Condor

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Abortion-rights protesters regroup and protest following Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, federally protected right to abortion, outside the Supreme Court in Washington on June 24, 2022. The Supreme Court has ended constitutional protections for abortion that had been in place nearly 50 years, a decision by its conservative majority to overturn the court's landmark abortion cases. Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP hide caption

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Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

The Public Health Implications Of Overturning Roe V. Wade

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