Rebecca Ramirez Rebecca Ramirez is the founding producer of NPR's daily science podcast, Short Wave.
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Rebecca Ramirez

Rebecca Ramirez

Associate Producer, Short Wave

Rebecca Ramirez (she/her) is the founding producer of NPR's daily science podcast, Short Wave. It's a meditation in how to be a Swiss Army Knife, in that it involves a little of everything — background research, finding and booking sources, interviewing guests, writing, cutting the tape, editing, scoring ... you get the idea.

Ramirez's journey to radio producer was a happy accident. At the University of Southern California, she pursued a double major in history and neuroscience. It was fun and engaging, but with no obvious career path. She answered an ad for an internship while playing an NPR podcast, and got hired! After graduation, she began an internship for Invisibilia, NPR's podcast about the unseeable forces that control human behavior. From there, she dove head-first into a completely different job - producing daily news on Morning Edition, NPR's daily morning news magazine. After a year, she jumped at the chance to help start a new NPR podcast. Aside from the joy of the hard work, Ramirez is involved in increasing NPR's diversity, both in its journalism through source diversity efforts and on staff as a leader of the Marginialized Genders and Intersex People of Color (MGIPOC) Mentorship Program.

Ramirez hails from Florida and lives in Washington, D.C.

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Cars sit on the edge of a sinkhole in the Charles Village neighborhood of Baltimore, Wednesday, April 30, 2014, as heavy rain moves through the region. Roads closed due to flooding, downed trees and electrical lines elsewhere in the Mid-Atlantic. AP hide caption

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AP

Why Baltimore Is Suing Big Oil Over Climate Change

(Encore episode.) Earlier this year, the Supreme Court heard arguments in a case brought by the city of Baltimore against more than a dozen major oil and gas companies including BP, ExxonMobil and Shell. In the lawsuit, BP P.L.C. v. Mayor and City Council of Baltimore, the city government argued that the fossil fuel giants must help pay for the costs of climate change because they knew that their products cause potentially catastrophic global warming. NPR climate reporter Rebecca Hersher has been following the case.

Why Baltimore Is Suing Big Oil Over Climate Change

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An algorithm was able to very reliably detect which chirps came from which individual naked mole-rat. So each naked mole-rat has its own distinctive voice. Felix Petermann/MDC hide caption

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Felix Petermann/MDC

What's In A Squeak? For Naked Mole Rats ... EVERYTHING

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Google is one of the companies investing in building quantum computers. Google hide caption

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Google

Is The Future Quantum?

NPR science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel takes us to IonQ, one of the companies betting on a quantum computing future. Along the way, Geoff explains what little researchers know about how we might actually use this technology. There are hints though quantum computing could change everything from discovering new drugs to developing advanced materials.

Is The Future Quantum?

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A container at the Bodega Marine Lab in California holds hundreds of purple urchins harvested from the Mendocino County coast where they have been destroying kelp forests. Terry Chea/AP hide caption

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Terry Chea/AP

The Purple Urchins Don't Die

NPR climate correspondent Lauren Sommer explains how scientists are getting creative to deal with the hordes of urchins overtaking kelp forests in the Pacific Ocean — and why this kind of drastic ecological change may become more common as the climate gets hotter.

The Purple Urchins Don't Die

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Curtis Wynn, president and CEO of Roanoke Electric Cooperative, with a bi-directional charger that can use electricity from an electric vehicle's battery to power a building. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

How A New Deal Legacy Is Building Clean Energy In Rural North Carolina

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People eye each other with suspicion while dealing with the fear of Coronavirus. LA Johnson hide caption

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LA Johnson

The U.S. Has A History Of Linking Disease With Race And Ethnicity

(Encore episode.) The coronavirus is all over the headlines these days. Accompanying those headlines? Suspicion and harassment of Asians and Asian Americans. Our colleague Gene Demby, co-host of NPR's Code Switch podcast, explains that this is part of a longer history in the United States of camouflaging xenophobia and racism as public health and hygiene concerns. We hear from historian Erika Lee, author of "America For Americans: A History Of Xenophobia In The United States."

The U.S. Has A History Of Linking Disease With Race And Ethnicity

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An elderly couple wearing face masks walks in Madrid on April 30, 2020 during a national lockdown to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 disease. Gabriel Bouys/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriel Bouys/AFP via Getty Images

Planetary scientist Roger Fu hikes through the Pilbara region of Australia, looking for rock samples that are billions of years old. Alec Brenner hide caption

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Alec Brenner

What Earth Looked Like 3.2 Billion Years Ago

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The Anthem, a popular live music venue, displays a message of support on their marquee. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Our Pandemic Future

It's been about a year since the coronavirus pandemic started to take hold in the United States. Recently, NPR science correspondent Rob Stein has been talking to infectious disease experts, epidemiologists, public health officials, medical historians and for the first time, many are cautiously offering hope. They say the worst may be finally over — but factors like vaccination rates, changes to public health policy and variant resistance to vaccines could upend that recovery.

Our Pandemic Future

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued its first set of recommendations for fully vaccinated people. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

CDC's Do's and Don'ts For Fully Vaccinated People

The CDC released new guidance Monday, allowing people fully vaccinated against COVID-19 to resume some pre-pandemic activities, including gathering indoors with other vaccinated people without wearing masks. Health correspondent Allison Aubrey walks us through the new recommendations and what precautions fully vaccinated people still need to take.

CDC's Do's and Don'ts For Fully Vaccinated People

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Rainelle, W.Va., flooded in June 2016. Research has found that disasters can erode family stability and exacerbate mental and physical ailments when people don't have the money they need to repair their homes. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Millions Of U.S. Homes Face An Expensive Flooding Threat

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A gas ring on a household stove powered by natural gas is seen alight. In many states across the US, efforts to limit natural gas are being stymied by legislation. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

The Fight Over The Future Of Natural Gas

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Urine samples for analysis in test tubes. Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Micro Wave: Let's Talk About Urine

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The magnets used in these letters are one of the more obvious uses of magnets, but magnets are also found in many other household objects. Fred Tanneau/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Tanneau/AFP via Getty Images

Magnets: The Hidden Objects Powering Your Life

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