Simon Schütz
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Simon Schütz

Simon Schütz

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel chats with CDU General Secretary Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer in Berlin last month. Kramp-Karrenbauer is among three leading candidates seeking to run the party next month. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Björn Höcke (center), a politician from the Alternative for Germany party, participates in a march in Chemnitz, eastern Germany, on Sept. 1, after several nationalist groups called for marches protesting the killing of a German man allegedly by migrants. Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Jens Meyer/AP

German Chancellor Angela Merkel leaves a press conference after a leadership meeting at her party headquarters in Berlin on Monday. Hardliners in her conservative bloc want to bar asylum-seekers from entering Germany if they've already applied or registered for asylum in other European countries. Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images

Alternative for Germany leaders Alexander Gauland and Alice Weidel listen to German Chancellor Angela Merkel answer questions at Germany's parliament on June 6. Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images

Alexander Gauland, 76, and Alice Weidel, 38, are the leaders of the populist, anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany party. They will both take seats in the country's Parliament later this month. John Macdougall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John Macdougall/AFP/Getty Images

The far-right Alternative for Germany party came in third place nationally, but in the eastern state of Saxony, where the town of Pirna is located, the party finished first with 27 percent of the vote. Jens Schlueter/Getty Images hide caption

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Jens Schlueter/Getty Images

AfD top candidates Alexander Gauland, left, and Alice Weidel celebrate with their supporters during the election party of the nationalist Alternative for Germany, in Berlin, Sunday, after the polling stations for the parliament elections closed. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

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Martin Meissner/AP

Far-Right German Group Sees Last-Minute Bump In Polls Before Sunday's Election

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Alice Weidel and Alexander Gauland, leading candidates of the right-wing, populist Alternative for Germany (AfD) political party, stand near an AfD poster that reads: "Crime Through Immigration, The Refugee Wave Leaves Behind Clues!" Sept. 18 in Berlin. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images