Amanda Aronczyk Amanda Aronczyk is a co-host and reporter for Planet Money, NPR's award-winning podcast that finds creative, entertaining ways to make sense of the big, complicated forces that move our economy.
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Amanda Aronczyk

Amanda Aronczyk

Co-Host and Reporter, Planet Money

Amanda Aronczyk is a co-host and reporter for Planet Money, NPR's award-winning podcast that finds creative, entertaining ways to make sense of the big, complicated forces that move our economy. She joined the team in October 2019.

Before that, she was a reporter at WNYC, New York Public Radio, where she contributed stories to Radiolab, On the Media, United States of Anxiety, The Brian Lehrer Show and more. Aronczyk covered science and health, and she fondly remembers collecting saliva from voters to measure stress, corresponding with the Unabomber and using nose swabs to solve a classic office mystery: who came to work sick? She was also the lead reporter on the award-winning 10-story companion series to PBS' "The Emperor of All Maladies," presented by NPR and WNYC.

Aronczyk also teaches audio journalism at the Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY.

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Story Archive

The Planet Money billboard in Times Square. Amanda Aronczyk/NPR hide caption

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Amanda Aronczyk/NPR

Episode 964: BILLBOARDS

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Episode 959: Things We Learned in 2019

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Episode 951: Snakebite

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Francis Brauner was instrumental in helping launch a class-action lawsuit on behalf of current inmates at Louisiana's Angola prison, suing for care that allegedly caused them "needless pain and suffering." Charles A. Smith hide caption

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Charles A. Smith

Angola Prison Lawsuit Poses Question: What Kind Of Medical Care Do Inmates Deserve?

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Giselle is pursuing a career in family medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. For her, hiding her problems with anxiety and depression was not an option. Amanda Aronczyk/WNYC hide caption

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Amanda Aronczyk/WNYC

A Med Student Decides To Be Upfront About Her Mental Issues

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Melinda Townsend-Breslin holds a photo showing her and her mother standing in the parking lot of a favorite thrift store in 2013. William DeShazer for NPR hide caption

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William DeShazer for NPR

Medical Bills Linger, Long After Cancer Treatment Ends

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MaryAnn Anselmo has started to sing again after recovering from brain surgery and having successful treatment with a drug that targeted a mutation in her tumor cells. Dave Gershgorn/WNYC hide caption

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Dave Gershgorn/WNYC

Why Doctors Are Trying A Skin Cancer Drug To Treat A Brain Tumor

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Both James Eversull (left) and Pat Patchell were treated with experimental chemotherapy and radiation for leukemia as children in the 1960s. Together, they're now some of the country's oldest leukemia survivors.. Courtesy of James Eversull; Courtesy of Pat Patchell hide caption

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Courtesy of James Eversull; Courtesy of Pat Patchell

How 2 Children With Leukemia Helped Transform Its Treatment

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Cancer Patients And Doctors Struggle To Predict Survival

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Kathy Liu and her son Joey Xu talk to friends back home in Gainesville, Fla., from his hospital room in Cincinnati. Amanda Aronczyk/WNYC hide caption

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Amanda Aronczyk/WNYC

Son's Rare Cancer Leads Family On Quest For Cure

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Lissette Encarnacion in her apartment at The Brook, a supportive housing complex in the New York City borough of the Bronx. Natalie Fertig/WNYC hide caption

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Natalie Fertig/WNYC

New York Debates Whether Housing Counts As Health Care

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