Sushmita Pathak
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Sushmita Pathak

Sushmita Pathak

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Asha Gond (center right) rides her skateboard. When she first began skateboarding, neighbors would catcall that skateboarding is for boys and urge her parents to marry her off. Vicky Roy hide caption

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Vicky Roy

Skateboarding Gives Freedom To Rural Indian Teen In Netflix Film — And In Real Life

A new Netflix movie called Skater Girl chronicles the journey of an Indian teenage girl who discovers a life-changing passion for skateboarding. It's also the story of Asha Gond.

Rains have washed away the top layer of sand of shallow graves at a cremation ground on the banks of the Ganges River in Shringverpur, northwest of Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh, India. Coronavirus testing is limited in parts of rural India, but some of the people buried there are believed to have died of COVID-19. Ritesh Shukla/Getty Images hide caption

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Ritesh Shukla/Getty Images

In Rural India, Less COVID-19 Testing, More Fear — And A Few Ventilators For Millions

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Cyclists cycle past the main entrance of the Narendra Modi Stadium in Ahmedabad, India, a venue where cricket matches were taking place during the 2021 Indian Premier League — until it was suspended. Sam Panthaky /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Panthaky /AFP via Getty Images

India's Major Cricket Tournament Got Suspended. Should It Have Even Happened?

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A patient breathes with the help of oxygen provided at a tent installed at a gurdwara, a place of worship for Sikhs, in Ghaziabad, India, on May 2. Sajjad Hussain/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sajjad Hussain/AFP via Getty Images

Why Is India Running Out Of Oxygen?

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Victims of COVID-19 are cremated in funeral pyres this week in New Delhi. Scientists says the real death toll and number of infections are likely much higher than what the Indian government is reporting. Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images

India Is Counting Thousands Of Daily COVID Deaths. How Many Is It Missing?

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A medical worker is seen at a quarantine center for Covid-19 coronavirus infected patients at a banquet hall, which was converted into an isolation center to handle the rising cases of infection in New Delhi, India. Anindito Mukherjee/Getty Images hide caption

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Anindito Mukherjee/Getty Images

Men take a holy dip in the Ganges River on the occasion of first royal bath of Shivratri festival during Maha Kumbh Festival in Haridwar, India. Ritesh Shukla/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Ritesh Shukla/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Millions Flock To Hindu Festival Amid Coronavirus Spike

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Mumbai's grand Keshavji Nayak fountain towers above the street and serves as a place of respite for thirsty passers-by. It's one of dozens of ornate fountains in the city, built during the British colonial era. Viraj Nayar for NPR hide caption

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Viraj Nayar for NPR

PHOTOS: Mumbai Falls In Love All Over Again With Its Forgotten Fountains

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Reviving 19th Century Drinking Fountains Could Help Mumbai's Poor

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The award-winning documentary Writing with Fire follows Meera Devi (right), chief reporter for the Khabar Lahariya — a news publication run by Dalit, members of India's lowest caste. Black Ticket Films hide caption

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Black Ticket Films

A crowd watches people dressed in rat and flea costumes to illustrate the creatures that spread bubonic plague, which took millions of lives in India in the early 20th century. The photo was taken on Jan. 1, 1910. Hulton Deutsch/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Deutsch/Corbis via Getty Images

Indian journalist Priya Ramani (left) smiles as she leaves Patiala House Court in New Delhi in 2019. A New Delhi court on Wednesday acquitted Ramani of criminal defamation after she accused a former editor-turned-politician and junior external affairs minister, M.J. Akbar, of sexual harassment. AP hide caption

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AP