Lauren Sommer Lauren Sommer covers climate change for NPR's Science Desk.
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Lauren Sommer

Lauren Sommer

Correspondent, Science Desk

Lauren Sommer covers climate change for NPR's Science Desk, from the scientists on the front lines of documenting the warming climate to the way those changes are reshaping communities and ecosystems around the world.

Prior to joining NPR, Sommer spent more than a decade covering climate and environment for KQED Public Radio in San Francisco. During her time there, she delved into the impacts of California's historic drought during dry years and reported on destructive floods during wet years, and covered how communities responded to record-breaking wildfires.

Sommer has also examined California's ambitious effort to cut carbon emissions across its economy and investigated the legacy of its oil industry. On the lighter side, she ran from charging elephant seals and searched for frogs in Sierra Nevada lakes.

She was also host of KQED's macrophotography nature series Deep Look, which searched for universal truths in tiny organisms like black-widow spiders and parasites. Sommer has received a national Edward R. Murrow for use of sound, as well as awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Society of Environmental Journalists.

Based at NPR's San Francisco bureau, Sommer grew up in the West, minus a stint on the East Coast to attend Cornell University.

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College Labs Become Coronavirus Testing Facilities, Courtesy Of Student Volunteers

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United Nations officials are delaying a climate conference this fall, which many climate activists hoped would the biggest step forward since negotiations in Paris in 2015. Here, activists rally on Dec. 12, 2015. Francois Guillot/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Francois Guillot/AFP via Getty Images

Universities across the U.S. are gearing up to run coronavirus tests, much like the virology lab at UW Medicine, which includes the University of Washington's medical school and hospitals, started doing early on in the outbreak. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Deep Sea Squid May Communicate Through Glowing Pigmentation, Researchers Find

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Killer Kitties? Scientists Track What Outdoor Cats Are Doing All Day

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China's Efforts To Control Coronavirus Lead To Less Air Pollution

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February satellite readings in the troposphere (the lower atmosphere) of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a pollutant primarily from burning fossil fuels, show a dramatic decline compared to early January when power plants were operating at normal levels. NASA Earth Observatory hide caption

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NASA Earth Observatory

Climate Change May Make The Snapping Shrimp Snap Louder

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