Lauren Sommer Lauren Sommer covers climate change for NPR's Science Desk.
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Lauren Sommer

Lauren Sommer

Correspondent, Science Desk

Lauren Sommer covers climate change for NPR's Science Desk, from the scientists on the front lines of documenting the warming climate to the way those changes are reshaping communities and ecosystems around the world.

Prior to joining NPR, Sommer spent more than a decade covering climate and environment for KQED Public Radio in San Francisco. During her time there, she delved into the impacts of California's historic drought during dry years and reported on destructive floods during wet years, and covered how communities responded to record-breaking wildfires.

Sommer has also examined California's ambitious effort to cut carbon emissions across its economy and investigated the legacy of its oil industry. On the lighter side, she ran from charging elephant seals and searched for frogs in Sierra Nevada lakes.

She was also host of KQED's macrophotography nature series Deep Look, which searched for universal truths in tiny organisms like black-widow spiders and parasites. Sommer has received a national Edward R. Murrow for use of sound, as well as awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Society of Environmental Journalists.

Based at NPR's San Francisco bureau, Sommer grew up in the West, minus a stint on the East Coast to attend Cornell University.

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A California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection airplane drops fire retardant along a burning hill during the Glass Fire in Calistoga, Calif., in September. California is one of two states to require wildfire risk be disclosed to new homebuyers. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Millions Of Homes Are At Risk Of Wildfires, But It's Rarely Disclosed

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Destructive wildfires are on the rise in the United States. More than 40 million Americans live in zones at high risk because towns and cities have increasingly expanded into fire-prone landscapes. Kaz Fantone/NPR hide caption

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Kaz Fantone/NPR

Is Your Home At Risk Of Wildfire In A Changing Climate? 6 Questions To Ask

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A truck sits in still water after Hurricane Laura swept through Cameron Parish, La. The hurricane inflicted at least $8 billion in damage to southwest Louisiana when it hit in late August. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Some of California's most destructive wildfires aren't among the state's largest, so fire scientists advise focusing on homes instead of overall acreage. JOSH EDELSON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JOSH EDELSON/AFP via Getty Images

4 Million Acres Have Burned In California. Why That's The Wrong Number To Focus On

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An aerial view of the Tesla factory in Fremont, Calif., in May. Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order on Wednesday that bans the sale of new gasoline-powered vehicles in the state by 2035. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists Say Disasters Are Teaming Up During Time Of Climate Change

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Wildfires, Election Interference Highlight Political Inaction On Key Issues

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How Communities Are Remaking Themselves To Become Fire Resistant

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The five largest fires in California history have occurred since 2003, a sign that climate change is making extreme wildfires more frequent. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Everything Is Unprecedented. Welcome To Your Hotter Earth

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Floodwaters surround a newly constructed house for sale in Maine in 2018. Realtor.com added flood risk information to the more than 100 million listings on its site. Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Major Real Estate Website Now Shows Flood Risk. Should They All?

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Goode looks on as sourberry bushes burn. After the bushes are burned in the winter, they sprout again in the spring. Lauren Sommer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/NPR

To Manage Wildfire, California Looks To What Tribes Have Known All Along

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A redwood forest caught in the CZU Lightning Complex Fire on the Northern California coast. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Wildfires Hit California's Redwoods And Condors, But There's Still Hope

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Extreme heat waves are becoming more common, but California doesn't consider extreme scenarios when planning for summer electricity use. FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

Climate Change Lesson From California's Blackouts: Prepare For Extremes

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California Scrambles For Another Day To Avoid Rolling Blackouts

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