Lauren Sommer Lauren Sommer covers climate change for NPR's Science Desk.
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Lauren Sommer

Lauren Sommer

Correspondent, Science Desk

Lauren Sommer covers climate change for NPR's Science Desk, from the scientists on the front lines of documenting the warming climate to the way those changes are reshaping communities and ecosystems around the world.

Prior to joining NPR, Sommer spent more than a decade covering climate and environment for KQED Public Radio in San Francisco. During her time there, she delved into the impacts of California's historic drought during dry years and reported on destructive floods during wet years, and covered how communities responded to record-breaking wildfires.

Sommer has also examined California's ambitious effort to cut carbon emissions across its economy and investigated the legacy of its oil industry. On the lighter side, she ran from charging elephant seals and searched for frogs in Sierra Nevada lakes.

She was also host of KQED's macrophotography nature series Deep Look, which searched for universal truths in tiny organisms like black-widow spiders and parasites. Sommer has received a national Edward R. Murrow for use of sound, as well as awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Society of Environmental Journalists.

Based at NPR's San Francisco bureau, Sommer grew up in the West, minus a stint on the East Coast to attend Cornell University.

Story Archive

Thursday

Sibley Street, along with other residential roads were closed due to flooding from recent rain storms resulting in high water levels in Willow Creek, in Folsom, California. Kenneth James/California Department of Water Resources hide caption

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Kenneth James/California Department of Water Resources

California's flooding reveals we're still building cities for the climate of the past

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Tuesday

Coping with climate change: Advice for kids — from kids

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Saturday

Deadly and costly storms hit California again

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Friday

Roads and infrastructure are increasing being overwhelmed by heavier rainfall, like the California Central Valley town of Planada in January. Most states still aren't designing water systems for heavier storms. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Federal climate forecasts could help prepare for extreme rain. But it's years away

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Wednesday

Most reservoirs aren't allowed to fill up in the winter, but Folsom Reservoir outside of Sacramento, California is using a new strategy to save more water by using weather forecasts. Ken James/California Department of Water Resources hide caption

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Ken James/California Department of Water Resources

Heavy rain is still hitting California. A few reservoirs figured out how to capture more for drought

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Thursday

Australia's Great Barrier Reef is being hit hard by climate change, but new research is showing how some corals are more resilient to heat. Sam McNeil/AP hide caption

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Sam McNeil/AP

How can coral reefs deal with climate change? Get better roommates

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Monday

World leaders have reached a new agreement on climate change

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Sunday

The COP27 summit went late into overtime, with Sameh Shoukry, president of the climate summit, speaking during a closing session on Sunday. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Did the world make progress on climate change? Here's what was decided at global talks

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Thursday

When he was younger, climate change felt like an abstract concept to Gabriel Nagel. Then a wildfire burned near his home. Eli Imadali hide caption

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Eli Imadali

Coping with climate change: Advice for kids — from kids

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Friday

President Joe Biden spoke at the COP27 climate negotiations in Egypt. The President said the United States will meet its promises to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by 2030. Gehad Hamdy/dpa/picture alliance via Getty hide caption

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Gehad Hamdy/dpa/picture alliance via Getty

An iceberg in Ilulissat, Greenland. Ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are melting rapidly, and that melt will accelerate as the Earth heats up. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Workers in Germany construct a new pipeline for transporting natural gas imports from a nearby liquified natural gas facility. European countries are seeking new sources of natural gas, as they wean themselves off imports from Russia. David Hecker/Getty Images hide caption

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David Hecker/Getty Images

Thursday

Workers at a coal mine in Ukraine start their shifts. Russia's invasion of Ukraine disrupted global supplies of fossil fuels and led to more reliance on coal for electricity in some countries. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR