Lauren Sommer Lauren Sommer covers climate change for NPR's Science Desk.
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Lauren Sommer

Lauren Sommer

Correspondent, Science Desk

Lauren Sommer covers climate change for NPR's Science Desk, from the scientists on the front lines of documenting the warming climate to the way those changes are reshaping communities and ecosystems around the world.

Prior to joining NPR, Sommer spent more than a decade covering climate and environment for KQED Public Radio in San Francisco. During her time there, she delved into the impacts of California's historic drought during dry years and reported on destructive floods during wet years, and covered how communities responded to record-breaking wildfires.

Sommer has also examined California's ambitious effort to cut carbon emissions across its economy and investigated the legacy of its oil industry. On the lighter side, she ran from charging elephant seals and searched for frogs in Sierra Nevada lakes.

She was also host of KQED's macrophotography nature series Deep Look, which searched for universal truths in tiny organisms like black-widow spiders and parasites. Sommer has received a national Edward R. Murrow for use of sound, as well as awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Society of Environmental Journalists.

Based at NPR's San Francisco bureau, Sommer grew up in the West, minus a stint on the East Coast to attend Cornell University.

Story Archive

World leaders have reached a new agreement on climate change

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The COP27 summit went late into overtime, with Sameh Shoukry, president of the climate summit, speaking during a closing session on Sunday. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Did the world make progress on climate change? Here's what was decided at global talks

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When he was younger, climate change felt like an abstract concept to Gabriel Nagel. Then a wildfire burned near his home. Eli Imadali hide caption

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Eli Imadali

Coping with climate change: Advice for kids — from kids

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President Joe Biden spoke at the COP27 climate negotiations in Egypt. The President said the United States will meet its promises to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by 2030. Gehad Hamdy/dpa/picture alliance via Getty hide caption

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Gehad Hamdy/dpa/picture alliance via Getty

An iceberg in Ilulissat, Greenland. Ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are melting rapidly, and that melt will accelerate as the Earth heats up. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Workers in Germany construct a new pipeline for transporting natural gas imports from a nearby liquified natural gas facility. European countries are seeking new sources of natural gas, as they wean themselves off imports from Russia. David Hecker/Getty Images hide caption

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David Hecker/Getty Images

Workers at a coal mine in Ukraine start their shifts. Russia's invasion of Ukraine disrupted global supplies of fossil fuels and led to more reliance on coal for electricity in some countries. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

A group of scientists from the United Kingdom trek up to a research site on the west side of the Greenland ice sheet near Kangerlussuaq in the summer of 2022. This year marks the 26th year that Greenland has lost more ice than it gained. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Here are 3 dangerous climate tipping points the world is on track for

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Former US Vice President Al Gore speaks during the TRACE Greenhouse Gas Inventory launch at the plenary hall during the 2022 United Nations Climate Change Conference COP27. Gehad Hamdy/dpa/Picture Alliance via Getty hide caption

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Gehad Hamdy/dpa/Picture Alliance via Getty
Mario Tama/Getty Images

COP-out: who's liable for climate change destruction?

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Muhammad Shehbaz Sharif, prime minister of Pakistan, listens to speeches during the conference. He took the stage today, as well, explaining the impact of catastrophic flooding in Pakistan this summer. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, listens to Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi, giving a speech during the COP27 U.N. Climate Summit. Nariman El-Mofty/AP hide caption

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Nariman El-Mofty/AP

Uwen Garae surveys his damaged house in Port Vila, Vanuatu in the aftermath of Cyclone Pam in 2015. The country has been hit with two category 5 storms in the last 7 years. Dave Hunt/AP hide caption

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Dave Hunt/AP

Do wealthy countries owe poorer ones for climate change? One country wrote up a bill

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A mine railway operator in Eastern Ukraine waits as workers disembark. Russia's invasion of Ukraine disrupted global supplies of fossil fuels and led to more reliance on coal for electricity in some countries. The future sources of energy around the world are major topics at climate negotiations underway in Egypt starting this week. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

FAQ: What's at stake at the COP27 global climate negotiations

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