Jinae West
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Jinae West

Jinae West

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Co-hosts Peter Kafka and Rani Molla dive deep into the streaming service in the podcast Land of the Giants. Vox Media hide caption

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Vox Media

Regina King attends the Premiere Of HBO's Watchmen at The Cinerama Dome. Frazer Harrison/Getty Images hide caption

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Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Andrew Stuart wears a bandana as a mask while taking a selfie with his dog, Voltron, on Sunset Blvd, Thursday, July 2, 2020, in West Hollywood, Calif. Ashley Landis/AP hide caption

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Ashley Landis/AP

Coronavirus Questions Answered, Plus A Chat About 'Indian Matchmaking'

Should I wear a mask while running? How often should I wipe down my phone? Can I say hello to other people's dogs? Our listeners had questions about coronavirus, we have answers. Sam is joined by Short Wave host Maddie Sofia to dig into the science behind some of the decisions we have to make about everyday encounters in this pandemic. Then, Sam is all caught up in the buzz around Netflix's Indian Matchmaking, and he calls up journalist and former It's Been a Minute intern Hafsa Fathima to break it down.

Coronavirus Questions Answered, Plus A Chat About 'Indian Matchmaking'

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Two women and a child wait to take a COVID-19 test at a mobile testing site in Los Angeles on Wednesday, July 22, 2020. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

It's A Women's Recession

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Michaela Coel plays Arabella in the HBO series I May Destroy You. Natalie Seery/HBO hide caption

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Natalie Seery/HBO

Columbia University class of 2020 graduates pose for celebratory photographs on Commencement Day around the Alma Mater statue near the Low Memorial Library Wednesday, May 20, 2020, in New York. Frank Franklin II/AP hide caption

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Frank Franklin II/AP

What's College Without A Campus? Plus Ziwe Makes Things Awkward

Colleges and universities are getting ready for a new year, but like everything else, coronavirus is complicating everything. Some are closing campus and moving online, others plan to bring students back with social distancing. Sam checks in with Tressie McMillan Cottom, associate professor at UNC-Chapel Hill and author of Lower Ed: The Troubling Rise of For-Profit Colleges in the New Economy, about the state of higher education and why not all colleges are created equal when it comes to prioritizing health over business. Then he chats with comedian and Desus and Mero writer Ziwe Fumudoh, whose recent interviews with white celebrities like Alison Roman and Rose McGowan have generated a lot of social media buzz for her frank questions about race. They talk about the art of the interview and her comfort with discomfort.

What's College Without A Campus? Plus Ziwe Makes Things Awkward

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Host Carla Alexander disinfects a table at the Saint Arnold Brewing Company, Friday, June 26, 2020, in Houston. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Paying The Price Of Coronavirus

Four months into the pandemic, it seems like we're no better off in dealing with the coronavirus. There are still so many questions and few definitive answers about how this all ends, and for a lot of us, that's turned into anger and frustration. Sam talks to comedian Laurie Kilmartin about how she used Twitter and her iPad to process her mother's illness and death from COVID-19. Then he chats with Houston bar owner Greg Perez about how he's trying to keep workers and customers safe while also keeping his business afloat. And Sam asks Dr. Olveen Carrasquillo in Miami about how to make sense of all the mixed public health messaging on the coronavirus.

Paying The Price Of Coronavirus

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Chelsea Handler's latest book is Life Will Be the Death of Me...and You Too! Emily Shur hide caption

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Emily Shur

Michaela Coel writes, directs and stars in I May Destroy You on HBO. Laura Radford/HBO hide caption

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Laura Radford/HBO

Summer Pop Culture Recs, Plus A Visit With Kirk Franklin

It's summer without a lot of the usual summer fun because, you know, pandemic. But we've got music and TV recommendations to keep you company. Joining Sam are All Things Considered co-host Audie Cornish and Code Switch co-host Gene Demby to chat about their TV picks — Netflix's Bojack Horseman and HBO's I May Destroy You — and to play a special summer songs version of Who Said That. Then, Sam chats with gospel musician, songwriter and author Kirk Franklin about how his music and faith are a balm for these turbulent times.

Summer Pop Culture Recs, Plus A Visit With Kirk Franklin

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Twitter headquarters in San Francisco, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

How Much Have Facebook And Twitter Changed Since 2016?

How much has Big Tech changed since the 2016 election? Sam is joined by Washington Post tech reporters Elizabeth Dwoskin and Tony Romm. They chat about Facebook and Twitter and how their platforms and views on free speech have evolved since the last presidential election. Sam also chats with Washington Post columnist and satirist Alexandra Petri about her book of essays Nothing Is Wrong and Here Is Why and how she uses humor to uncover bigger truths.

How Much Have Facebook And Twitter Changed Since 2016?

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Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients celebrate in front of the Supreme Court after the Supreme Court rejected President Donald Trump's effort to end legal protections for young immigrants, Thursday, June 18, 2020, in Washington. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Supreme Court Protects Rights For DACA And LGBTQ Workers

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Author James McBride's new book is Deacon King Kong. Chia Messina hide caption

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Chia Messina

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 12: Black Lives Matter supporters are seen on the roof of a van during a rally in Trafalgar Square on June 12, 2020 in London, United Kingdom. (Photo by Peter Summers/Getty Images) Peter Summers/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Summers/Getty Images

Lessons About Racism from 'Cops' and 'Gone With The Wind'

The killing of George Floyd has inspired global protests against police brutality, and it seems like everyone has something to say, including the entertainment industry. Sam's joined by NPR television critic Eric Deggans and Tonya Mosley, co-host of NPR/WBUR's Here & Now and host of the KQED podcast Truth Be Told. They talk about the cancellation of the long-running reality TV show Cops, the removal of Gone With the Wind from HBO Max, and what it all says about this moment. After that, Sam chats with Rev. Jacqui Lewis, senior minister at Middle Collegiate Church in Manhattan, and Rev. angel Kyodo williams, a Zen priest. They talk about what Black people and white people should be doing differently now and give Sam a bit of sermon.

Lessons About Racism from 'Cops' and 'Gone With The Wind'

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Demonstrators raise their fists in downtown Los Angeles on June 3, during a protest over the death of George Floyd. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Not Just Another Protest

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A worker wears a protective glove as he takes money from a moviegoer at a ticket booth at Mission Tiki drive-in theater in Montclair, Calif., Thursday, May 28, 2020. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Money and Coronavirus; Samantha Irby On Judge Mathis

The coronavirus pandemic has us worrying not only about our health, but also about money. Sam talks to CBS News business analyst Jill Schlesinger, about the current economic crisis and how it's affecting different generations. Then, Sam talks to writer Samantha Irby about her newsletter "Who's On Judge Mathis Today?," which recaps the foibles of the syndicated daytime court show Judge Mathis.

Money and Coronavirus; Samantha Irby On Judge Mathis

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