Jinae West
Stories By

Jinae West

Jinae West

Story Archive

smartboy10/Getty Images

Vaccine Disinformation For Hire; Plus, Hannah Waddingham Of 'Ted Lasso'

Disinformation about COVID-19 vaccines abounds on social media, but there's more to it than meets the eye. Sam talks to Max Fisher, international reporter for the New York Times, about "disinformation for hire" and what social media platforms are doing to combat it. Plus, Sam talks to actress Hannah Waddingham, one of the stars of Ted Lasso. They're also joined by fellow cast member Jeremy Swift to play Who Said That.

Vaccine Disinformation For Hire; Plus, Hannah Waddingham Of 'Ted Lasso'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1022380651/1022919332" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A "Help Wanted" sign posted in Brooklyn New York. Gabriela Bhaskar/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gabriela Bhaskar/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Why Workers Are Quitting; Plus The Comfort Of Horror Movies

Americans are quitting their jobs in record numbers. Guest host Ayesha Rascoe brings on CBS MoneyWatch editor Irina Ivanova to break down some of the reasons why. Then, The New Republic staff writer Jo Livingstone joins Ayesha to discuss the current state of horror movies and why nothing's better than a good scare. Author and Big Mood, Little Mood podcast host Daniel Lavery joins them to play Who Said That.

Why Workers Are Quitting; Plus The Comfort Of Horror Movies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1016509469/1017016714" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Donald Trump mocks Christine Blasey Ford's testimony during a rally in Southaven, Mississippi, on October 2, 2018. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Trump's America And Why 'The Cruelty Is The Point'

The Cruelty Is The Point: The Past, Present, and Future of Trump's America, is journalist Adam Serwer's new book, based on a popular essay he wrote for The Atlantic. Serwer talks with guest host Ayesha Rascoe and lays out the ways in which Donald Trump came to power, the historical roots of his vision of law and order, and how he managed to build a loyal political following on the basis of cruelty.

Trump's America And Why 'The Cruelty Is The Point'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1014208767/1015423383" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sha'Carri Richardson competes in the Women's 100 Meter on day 2 of the 2020 U.S. Olympic Track & Field Team Trials at Hayward Field on June 19, 2021 in Eugene, Oregon. Andy Lyons/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andy Lyons/Getty Images

The Weight On Black Women In Sports; Plus, 'We Are Lady Parts'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1014317281/1014825007" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Vin Diesel and Paul Walker in a scene from the film 'The Fast And The Furious', 2001. (Photo by Universal/Getty Images) Archive Photos/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Archive Photos/Getty Images

Pop Culture Happy Hour: F9 Is Somehow Faster And Furious-er

Sam sits in the guest seat at Pop Culture Happy Hour to discuss the glue that holds this nation together — The Fast and the Furious franchise. Alongside NPR White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, as well as PCHH hosts Linda Holmes and Aisha Harris, the group talks about the legacy of the decades-spanning series, why we love to hate it, and how action films of this caliber could be considered "hetero camp."

Pop Culture Happy Hour: F9 Is Somehow Faster And Furious-er

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1011722650/1012515617" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Allen Weisselberg, chief financial officer of Trump Organization Inc., center, exits from criminal court on Thursday, July 1, 2021. The Trump Organization's longtime chief financial officer has surrendered to authorities in New York, facing tax-related charges resulting from Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr.'s years-long criminal probe. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Trump's Bad Business Comes Back To Bite

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1012172225/1012528731" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

ACT UP demonstration at Foley Square, Federal Plaza, June 30, 1987. From left to right: Steve Gendin, DoneMark Aurigemma, Douglas Montgomery,Charles Stimson, Frank O'Dowd, Avram Finkelstein. Donna Binder hide caption

toggle caption
Donna Binder

ACT UP: A History Of AIDS/HIV Activism

Forty years ago this month, the CDC reported on patients with HIV/AIDS in the United States for the very first time. The disease was understudied, under-reported and deeply stigmatized. ACT UP united a diverse, non-partisan group of individuals committed to direct action to end the AIDS crisis. In her new book, Let The Record Show: A Political History of ACT UP New York, 1987-1993, Sarah Schulman draws from nearly 200 interviews with ACT UP members to document the movement's history and explore how the group's activism transformed the way the media, the government, corporations and medical professionals talked about AIDS and provided treatment. She and Sam discuss this transformation and its relevance to social movements today.

ACT UP: A History Of AIDS/HIV Activism

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1007361916/1007998146" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Maricopa County ballots cast in the 2020 general election are examined and recounted by contractors working for Florida-based company, Cyber Ninjas at Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Phoenix on May 6, 2021. Matt York/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt York/AP

What's This Arizona Recount About? Plus, Summer Movie Picks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1005370186/1005720706" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Demonstrators blocked Market Street in an attempt to shut down the annual Pride Parade in San Francisco, California, on Sunday, June 30, 2019. The group was anti-police. Gabrielle Lurie/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gabrielle Lurie/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images

Kink, Cops And Corporations At Pride? Plus, Natalie Morales On 'Plan B'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1002851486/1003457028" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sam Sanders and Malcolm Gladwell live in conversation on Sept. 11, 2019 in Washington, D.C. Alexander McCall/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Alexander McCall/NPR

Malcolm Gladwell And 'Talking To Strangers'

Sam revisits his chat with best-selling author Malcolm Gladwell about his book, Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know About the People We Don't Know. The book explores examples such as the arrest of Sandra Bland and the Stanford rape case as to why interactions with strangers often go so wrong. This episode was taped in front of a live studio audience at The George Washington University's Lisner Auditorium in September 2019.

Malcolm Gladwell And 'Talking To Strangers'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1000175946/1000855882" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

You don't have to go to the beach to enjoy a beach read. Katrin Ray Shumakov/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Katrin Ray Shumakov/Getty Images

Hot Book Summer

It's almost summer, and whether you're at a beach, at a park, or at home, it's a great time to get lost in a book. Sam is joined by Barrie Hardymon, senior editor of NPR's Weekend Edition, and Traci Thomas, host of the podcast The Stacks. They give advice on how to get back into the habit of reading and recommend a few great summer reads: Yolk by Mary H.K. Choi, How the Word Is Passed by Clint Smith, Wild Rain by Beverly Jenkins and Filthy Animals by Brandon Taylor. They also play a special edition of "Who Said That?"

Hot Book Summer

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1000232798/1000991067" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Members of the Supreme Court pose for a group photo at the Supreme Court in Washington. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times via AP, Pool, File) Erin Schaff/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Erin Schaff/AP

The Real Justices Of SCOTUS

Sam previews this summer's Supreme Court rulings with Slate's Mark Joseph Stern and why some of those cases could potentially have big repercussions on daily life. They also discuss the future of the Court, including its decision to take up two of the most controversial issues of today — abortion and gun rights — and why the drama between justices can sometimes equate to a Real Housewives–style argument over dinner (with table flip).

The Real Justices Of SCOTUS

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/999078292/999859620" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Patrons at SOCIAL!, a social distanced dance club, get their groove on in their own spotlights. Stephanie Berger/SOCIAL! hide caption

toggle caption
Stephanie Berger/SOCIAL!

Labor Market Mysteries; Plus, Signs Of Life

The U.S. unemployment rate is still high... so why are we in a labor shortage? Sam chats with Stacey Vanek Smith, host of NPR's The Indicator, and Cardiff Garcia, former co-host of The Indicator, about the American job market and why businesses are having such a hard time hiring. Then, as vaccines have become more widely available and pandemic restrictions lift across the country, people are wandering back out into the world, having experiences they haven't had in over a year. We drop in on a few of these: a dance party, a first date, a game with friends — the small pleasures folks have missed that now feel monumental.

Labor Market Mysteries; Plus, Signs Of Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/998656431/999300629" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Michelle Buteau attends the Tales of the City New York premiere at The Metrograph on June 3, 2019 in New York City. Dia Dipasupil/WireImage hide caption

toggle caption
Dia Dipasupil/WireImage

After Defunding The Police; Plus, Michelle Buteau On 'The Circle'

What does defunding the police really look like? Sam talks to Austin City Council Member Greg Casar about how decreasing the city's police budget has worked— and what they aren't getting quite right yet. Then, Sam talks to KUT reporter Audrey McGlinchy about how Texas, a Republican-led state, has responded and what that could mean for other cities trying to follow in the footsteps of Austin. Plus, Sam talks to actress and comedian Michelle Buteau about hosting the Netflix reality competition show The Circle and how she feels about being cast as the sassy best friend.

After Defunding The Police; Plus, Michelle Buteau On 'The Circle'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/996555171/997022103" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mj Rodriguez as Blanca on Pose. Pari Dukovic/FX hide caption

toggle caption
Pari Dukovic/FX

Mj Rodriguez On 'Pose' And Perseverance

As the groundbreaking series Pose comes to a close in its third and final season, Sam talks to Mj Rodriguez about the end of her role as Blanca, the loving and lovable house mother at the center of the show. They also chat about the start of her career as Angel in Rent, channeling grief into her character, and LGBTQIA+ perseverance.

Mj Rodriguez On 'Pose' And Perseverance

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/989925909/993180480" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript