John Ruwitch John Ruwitch is a correspondent with NPR's international desk. He covers Chinese affairs.
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John Ruwitch

Dana Patrick
John Ruwitch headshot
Dana Patrick

John Ruwitch

Correspondent, International Desk

John Ruwitch is a correspondent with NPR's international desk. He covers Chinese affairs.

Ruwitch joined NPR in early 2020, and has since chronicled the tectonic shift in America's relations with China, from hopeful engagement to suspicion-fueled competition. He's also reported on a range of other issues, including Beijing's pressure campaign on Taiwan, Hong Kong's National Security Law, Asian-Americans considering guns for self-defense in the face of rising violence and a herd of elephants roaming in the Chinese countryside in search of a home.

Ruwitch joined NPR after more than 19 years with Reuters in Asia, the last eight of which were in Shanghai. There, he first covered a broad beat that took him as far afield as the China-North Korea border and the edge of the South China Sea. Later, he led a team that covered business and financial markets in the world's second biggest economy. Ruwitch has also had postings in Hanoi, Hong Kong and Beijing, reporting on anti-corruption campaigns, elite Communist politics, labor disputes, human rights, currency devaluations, earthquakes, snowstorms, Olympic badminton and everything in between.

Ruwitch studied history at U.C. Santa Cruz and got a master's in Regional Studies East Asia from Harvard. He speaks Mandarin and Vietnamese.

Story Archive

Vaccine hesitancy may hamper China's efforts to ease COVID restrictions

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China lifts some COVID lockdowns, but it's unknown how fast policy will change

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Protests raise questions about why China is still relying on COVID restrictions

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Protesters shout slogans during a protest against China's strict coronavirus measures on Monday in Beijing, China. Protesters took to the streets in multiple Chinese cities after a deadly apartment fire in Xinjiang province sparked a national outcry as many blamed COVID-19 restrictions for the deaths. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Some say a protest could worsen a delay in Apple's latest iPhone production

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US President Joe Biden (R) and China's President Xi Jinping (L) shake hands as they meet on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Nusa Dua on the Indonesian resort island of Bali on November 14, 2022. SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

As Biden and Xi meet in Bali, rest of Asia watches closely, too

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President Biden and China's President Xi Jinping shake hands as they begin talks in Bali. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Biden and China's Xi met for three hours. Here's what they talked about

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What's on the cards for Biden's first meeting with Xi Jinping since taking office

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Left: U.S. President Joe Biden takes questions from reporters after he delivered remarks in the State Dining Room at the White House in Washington, DC on Wednesday. Right: Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Grand Hall in Beijing while welcoming German Chancelor Olaf Scholz on Nov. 4. Left: Samuel Corum/Getty Images, Right: Kay Nietfeld/Pool/AFP hide caption

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Left: Samuel Corum/Getty Images, Right: Kay Nietfeld/Pool/AFP

People eat lunch separated by plexiglass to prevent the spread of COVID-19 at the 20th National Congress of the Communist Party of China on Oct. 20 in Beijing. China is beginning to ease its strict COVID policies to help the stifled economy. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/Getty Images