John Ruwitch John Ruwitch is a correspondent with NPR's international desk. He covers Chinese affairs.
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John Ruwitch

Dana Patrick
John Ruwitch headshot
Dana Patrick

John Ruwitch

Correspondent, International Desk

John Ruwitch is a correspondent with NPR's international desk. He covers Chinese affairs.

Ruwitch joined NPR in early 2020, and has since chronicled the tectonic shift in America's relations with China, from hopeful engagement to suspicion-fueled competition. He's also reported on a range of other issues, including Beijing's pressure campaign on Taiwan, Hong Kong's National Security Law, Asian-Americans considering guns for self-defense in the face of rising violence and a herd of elephants roaming in the Chinese countryside in search of a home.

Ruwitch joined NPR after more than 19 years with Reuters in Asia, the last eight of which were in Shanghai. There, he first covered a broad beat that took him as far afield as the China-North Korea border and the edge of the South China Sea. Later, he led a team that covered business and financial markets in the world's second biggest economy. Ruwitch has also had postings in Hanoi, Hong Kong and Beijing, reporting on anti-corruption campaigns, elite Communist politics, labor disputes, human rights, currency devaluations, earthquakes, snowstorms, Olympic badminton and everything in between.

Ruwitch studied history at U.C. Santa Cruz and got a master's in Regional Studies East Asia from Harvard. He speaks Mandarin and Vietnamese.

Story Archive

The tennis world is calling on China to prove a Chinese tennis star is safe

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US-China Summit May Have Lowered The Temperature, But The Tough Issues Remain

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President Biden and China's Xi set to have their 1st formal meeting as leaders

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Extremists in Pakistan have been emboldened by the Taliban's success in Afghanistan

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Xi Jinping is in a good position to break norms and continue to lead China

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Pro-democracy activists (right) hold placards with the picture of Chinese citizen journalist Zhang Zhan as they march to the Chinese central government's liaison office in Hong Kong in Dec. 2020. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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A citizen journalist who shined a light on the pandemic in Wuhan may die in prison

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What the U.S. can learn from China's response to COVID infections

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China's rules may be rewritten to allow Xi Jinping to stay on longer as leader

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President Biden participates in a CNN town hall at the Baltimore Center Stage Pearlstone Theater, on Oct. 21. When asked whether the U.S. would protect Taiwan if China attacked, he said the U.S. has a "commitment" to do so. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Microsoft to end LinkedIn in China due to 'challenging' environment

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Suicide bomb explosion rips through a Shiite mosque in northern Afghanistan

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In this 2011 photo, then-U.S. Vice President Joe Biden walks with then-Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping in southwestern China. Both are now presidents of their countries at a time when U.S.-China relations have been growing increasingly tense. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Is China a threat or an opportunity? Depends which Americans you ask

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U.S.-Pakistan relations are at a crossroads

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