Sequoia Carrillo Sequoia Carrillo is an assistant editor for NPR's Education Team.
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Sequoia Carrillo

Liv Johnson
Sequoia Carrillo headshot
Liv Johnson

Sequoia Carrillo

Assistant Editor, NPR Ed

Sequoia Carrillo is an assistant editor for NPR's Education Team. Along with writing, producing, and reporting for the team, she manages the Student Podcast Challenge.

Prior to covering education at NPR, she started as an intern on the How I Built This team.

Sequoia holds a bachelor's degree in history and media studies from the University of Virginia. She is currently working towards her master's in journalism from Georgetown University.

Story Archive

Students at Pasadena City College, in Pasadena, Calif., participate in a graduation ceremony in 2019. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images
LA Johnson/NPR

200k student borrowers are closer to getting their loans erased after judge's ruling

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The future of abortion remains highly uncertain in Michigan. At the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, the student health center has been preparing for all possible scenarios, from a complete statewide ban on abortion to less extreme changes. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Colleges navigate confusing legal landscapes as new abortion laws take effect

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Yasmine Gateau for NPR

The U.S. student population is more diverse, but schools are still highly segregated

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Zoe Touray (left) Eliyah Cohen (middle) and RuQuan Brown (right) are some of the student activists leading the charge for gun reform. March For Our Lives (left) Sean Sugai (middle) Prolific Films (right) hide caption

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March For Our Lives (left) Sean Sugai (middle) Prolific Films (right)

As Biden weighs loan forgiveness, Americans are more worried about college's cost

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Students from George Washington University wear their graduation gowns outside the White House in May. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Americans support student loan forgiveness, but would rather rein in college costs

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Tegan Nam won the 2022 Student Podcast Challenge for high school with their story about using humor to process trauma. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

After a lockdown, students found comfort in humor. But what are the jokes hiding?

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Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio is one of three lawmakers calling for changes after an NPR investigation found mismanagement of income-driven repayment (IDR) plans for student loans. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Four years into her life in the U.S., Aria Young has realized she wants more balance between the two halves of herself — Yáng Qìn Yuè of Shanghai and Aria Young of New York City. Mohamed Sadek for NPR hide caption

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Mohamed Sadek for NPR

A Chinese student Americanized her name to fit in. It took more to feel she belonged

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Christina Cala/NPR

Holly Rodriguez found herself responsible for both her and her ex-husband's student loans. Parker Michels-Boyce for NPR hide caption

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Parker Michels-Boyce for NPR

Even divorce might not free you from your ex's student loan debt

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