Sequoia Carrillo Sequoia Carrillo is a reporter for NPR's Education Team.
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Sequoia Carrillo

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Headshot of Sequoia Carrillo
Courtesy of Sequoia Carrillo

Sequoia Carrillo

Reporter, NPR Ed

Sequoia Carrillo is an education reporter for NPR. She covers K-12 policy and regularly reports on issues like school segregation and infrastructure challenges for the network. Recently, she led a series of stories on the impacts of fentanyl in schools. She's also spent the past few years learning the ins and outs of the student loan system and hearing borrowers' stories. Her reporting on joint consolidation loans, a type of student loan that chained couples together even in cases of divorce and abuse, helped propel a fix into law.

She regularly reports on Indigenous communities and identity – from her own family's story to the legacies of federal Indian boarding schools to questions of tribal land ownership. Her reporting has appeared on numerous NPR podcasts including Code Switch, Throughline and Life Kit.

From 2020-2022, she managed the Student Podcast Challenge, an initiative to get younger voices on the airwaves. She still travels around the country with the contest to hear students' stories.

Prior to covering education at NPR, she started as an intern on the How I Built This team where she learned how to cut tape, wrangle guests and write out 100 questions before every interview.

Her life before NPR involved working as a historical tour guide in Charlottesville, Virginia and briefly sorting mail in a Hollywood talent agency.

Carrillo holds a bachelor's degree in history and media studies from the University of Virginia and a master's in journalism from Georgetown University. She lives in Los Angeles.

Story Archive

Tuesday

Graduates chant in support of Palestinians during the University of Michigan's commencement ceremony at Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor on Saturday. Katy Kildee/Detroit News via AP hide caption

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Katy Kildee/Detroit News via AP

How student protests are changing college graduations

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Tuesday

Schools try to balance freedom of speech and security during student protests

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Monday

A look at Biden's new plan for student debt relief

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U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona participates in an event at Dartmouth College in January. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Biden seeks student debt relief for millions

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Friday

Sunday

Students are still waiting for aid offers from colleges after a delayed FAFSA rollout

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Sunday

Thursday

Richard Stephen/Getty Images

This year it's a slow crawl to financial aid packages for students

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Monday

John Lamb/Getty Images

Yet another FAFSA problem: Many noncitizens can't fill it out

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Friday

From 2022-2023, chronic absenteeism declined in 33 of the 39 states AEI looked at. But it was still a persistent problem: In a handful of places, including Nevada, Washington, D.C., Michigan, New Mexico and Oregon, roughly 1 in 3 students – or more – were chronically absent. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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LA Johnson/NPR

K-12 students learned a lot last year, but they're still missing too much school

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Friday

Photo illustration by LA Johnson/Getty Images/NPR

How do you discipline an in-school overdose? In some districts, you don't

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Monday

Fallout continues from a controversial hearing on antisemitism on college campuses

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Sunday

Penn president resigns after testifying about antisemitism on campus

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Friday

After a disastrous testimony, three college presidents face calls to resign

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Friday

California joins a growing movement to teach media literacy in schools

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Thursday

Red Lake Reservation is rare because the tribal nation owns all of its land

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Wednesday

Nate Taylor (left) and Sylvia Fred (right), two of the co-founders of the Endazhi-Nitaawiging Charter School on Red Lake Reservation standing in front of the construction site for a new school building. Sequoia Carrillo/NPR hide caption

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Wednesday

Franziska Barczyk for NPR

Like it or not: Kids hear the news. Here's how teachers help them understand it

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Wednesday

Miami fire and rescue and police officers perform a rescue operation during an active shooter drill at Miami Senior High School in Miami, Fla. Chandan Khanna/Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/Getty Images

'No one wants kids dying in schools,' but Americans disagree on how to keep them safe

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Monday

Most Americans say schools should do active shooter drills, but disagree on approach

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Thursday

Photo illustration by LA Johnson/Getty Images/NPR

Naloxone can save students' lives, but not every school has it

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Wednesday

School districts rush to stock Narcan, the best defense against fentanyl

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Thursday

Nate Taylor (left) and Sylvia Fred (right), two of the co-founders of the Endazhi-Nitaawiging Charter School on Red Lake Reservation standing in front of the construction site for a new school building. Sequoia Carrillo/NPR hide caption

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Thursday

Kaitlin Brito for NPR

Extreme heat is cutting into recess for kids. Experts say that's a problem

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