Andrea Gutierrez Andrea Gutierrez is a producer on It's Been a Minute.
Andrea Gutierrez
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Andrea Gutierrez

Andrea Gutierrez
Andrea Gutierrez
Andrea Gutierrez

Andrea Gutierrez

Producer, It's Been a Minute

Andrea Gutierrez (she/her) is a producer on NPR podcast It's Been a Minute. She's drawn to stories at the intersections of gender, race, class and ability in arts and culture.

Gutierrez has produced and reported episodes about the Chicano Moratorium of 1970, pop music's Latin Explosion of 1999, Latinx voter outreach and the furor over Critical Race Theory as part of a longer history of culture wars in schools, as well as interviews with folks like Tiffany Haddish, Michaela Coel, Eric André, Desus Nice and The Kid Mero.

At NPR, she's also worked as a producer on Planet Money, and her work has appeared on Code Switch, Alt.Latino, All Things Considered and Up First.

Gutierrez is a longtime storyteller with work in print, digital and audio. She got her start in radio producing interviews and features for The Frame, a daily arts and entertainment show on Member station KPCC. There she reported award-winning features on the costume designer from Jojo Rabbit and a nonbinary performance artist's tribute to queer ranchera singer Chavela Vargas.

Past bylines include BBC World Service, CBC, LAist, The California Sunday Magazine, Marfa Public Radio, Bitch, make/shift, Huizache and the Los Angeles Review of Books.

Gutierrez's work has won honors and awards from the Podcast Academy, Los Angeles Press Club, National Association of Hispanic Journalists; NLGJA: The Association of LGBTQ Journalists and KCRW's 24-Hour Radio Race. She was an RIAS Berlin Fellow, IWMF Gwen Ifill Fellow and AIR New Voices Scholar. Prior to working in radio, she spent several years as a university administrator. She taught, counseled and mentored students at UC Berkeley, UCLA, UC Riverside and Cal State LA.

A first-generation college graduate and lifelong Southern Californian, Gutierrez received her bachelor's degree in German studies at Scripps College and her MFA in creative nonfiction at the University of California, Riverside. She's an alum of the Transom Traveling Workshop and the VONA Voices Workshop for writers of color.

Story Archive

Abortion-rights protesters wave flags during a demonstration outside of the U.S. Supreme Court, Sunday, May 8, 2022, in Washington. Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP hide caption

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Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

Pro-choice and anti-abortion activist rally outside of the U.S. Supreme Court on May 02, 2022 in Washington, DC. In an initial draft opinion obtained by Politico, Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito wrote that the cases Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey should be overturned, which would end federal protection of abortion rights. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

MONTGOMERY, AL - MARCH 30: Sydney Duncan holds a sign during a rally at the Alabama State House to draw attention to anti-transgender legislation introduced in Alabama on March 30, 2021 in Montgomery, Alabama. There are so far 192 anti-LGBTQ bills under consideration in state legislatures across the United States. Of those, 93 directly target transgender people. Julie Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Julie Bennett/Getty Images

Mask mandates on public transportation are no longer in effect following a ruling by federal judge on April 18, 2022. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

This Jan. 6, 2015, file photo shows an Etsy mobile credit card reader, in New York. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Simone Ashley as Kate Sharma and Jonathan Bailey as Anthony Bridgerton in season two of Bridgerton. Liam Daniel/Netflix hide caption

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Liam Daniel/Netflix

Two people sitting on a bench wearing protective masks using their phones as the coronavirus continues to spread across the United States on March 27, 2020 in New York City. Cindy Ord/Getty Images hide caption

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Cindy Ord/Getty Images

Lee Minho as Hansu and Minha Kim as Sunja in "Pachinko" (Apple TV+) Apple TV Plus hide caption

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Apple TV Plus

Bringing 'Pachinko' from page to the screen

Elise Hu chats with Soo Hugh, writer and showrunner of the much anticipated series Pachinko, based on the 2017 novel by Min Jin Lee. It's the epic story of a family through four generations across the 20th century, all about their lives as Zainichi Koreans in Japan. In this chat, Hugh talks about what it was like to bring the beloved book to screen, what she's is doing to support Asian American creators coming up behind her, and why this story resonates with people of all backgrounds.

Bringing 'Pachinko' from page to the screen

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Overview of the Oscar statue at "Meet the Oscars" at the Time Warner Center on February 25, 2010 in New York City. Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images

And the Oscar goes to...

A trimmed telecast? A crowd-sourced award? DJ Khaled as a presenter? The Oscars are back like you've never seen them before. Guest host Elise Hu is joined by Pop Culture Happy Hour host and reporter Aisha Harris and NPR film critic Bob Mondello to talk about these new changes and their top picks for who's taking home the big awards of the night. Then, they play a game of Who Said That.

And the Oscar goes to...

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Author Julissa Arce makes the case for rejecting assimilation in her latest book, You Sound Like a White Girl. Aly Honore hide caption

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Aly Honore

Rejecting assimilation in 'You Sound Like a White Girl'

A school crush once told Julissa Arce that she sounded "like a white girl." At the time, Arce believed that was exactly what she wanted. But over the years, even after perfecting "accent-less" English, graduating from college, getting a job at Goldman Sachs, and becoming an American citizen, Arce still felt like she didn't belong. Instead of just trying to fit in as the solution, Arce began to question whether that was the very problem to begin with. Elise Hu talks to Arce about her new book — You Sound Like a White Girl — and the case for rejecting assimilation in favor of embracing yourself, your history, and your culture.

Rejecting assimilation in 'You Sound Like a White Girl'

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ATLANTA, GA - MARCH 18: A year ago, activists demonstrate outside Gold Spa the shooting where three women were gunned down on in Atlanta, Georgia. Megan Varner/Getty Images hide caption

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Megan Varner/Getty Images

One year later, the Atlanta spa shootings; plus, tech on TV

It's been one year since the Atlanta-area spa shootings that claimed eight lives, six of whom were Asian women. Guest host Elise Hu reflects on the event with Nicole Chung, author of the memoir All You Can Ever Know and a contributing writer for The Atlantic. They discuss their own experiences and the unprecedented violence that Asian Americans—especially Asian American women—are facing.

One year later, the Atlanta spa shootings; plus, tech on TV

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Sam Sanders says goodbye to NPR. Josh Huskin/Josh Huskin hide caption

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Josh Huskin/Josh Huskin

Sam says goodbye

It's Been A Minute is sticking around, but before our beloved Sam Sanders takes flight we've got news to cover! In Sam's last episode as host, he's joined by NPR Weekend Edition Sunday host Ayesha Rascoe and NPR Congressional Correspondent Susan Davis to talk about the latest in politics news from gas prices to Ukraine to the upcoming US midterms. He then plays a special game of Who Said That? with his Aunt Betty and her friend, Lynette Maxwell.

Sam says goodbye

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Women look at a screen displaying exchange rate at a currency exchange office in St. Petersburg, Russia, Tuesday, March 1, 2022. In the days since the West imposed sanctions on Russia over its invasion of Ukraine, ordinary Russians are feeling the painful effects — from payment systems that won't operate and problems withdrawing cash to not being able to purchase certain items. Dmitri Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Dmitri Lovetsky/AP

Sanctions 101

In the wake of Russia's invasion of Ukraine, global powers have put the pressure on with sanctions upon sanctions. But what does that even mean? Class is in session as Sam attends Sanctions 101 with Cardiff Garcia, host of The New Bazaar, and Stacey Vanek Smith, co-host of The Indicator. They talk about how economic sanctions are supposed to work and whether they can be effective enough to change anything on the ground.

Sanctions 101

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Johnny Knoxville gets hit by a bull in his latest film Jackass Forever. Sean Cliver/Courtesy of Paramount Pictures hide caption

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Sean Cliver/Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

'Jackass' star Johnny Knoxville has nothing left to prove

It's our 500th episode and what better way to celebrate than with Johnny Knoxville's first appearance on NPR? We couldn't think of a better milestone. In this episode, Sam and Johnny chat about his latest Jackass endeavor with Jackass Forever while also looking back at the reality show that started it all — and how its very first stunt actually shut down production. They also discuss Jackass' queer fanbase and Johnny's time in therapy. Come for the talk about raunchy stunts, stay for the Johnny Knoxville School of Radical Acceptance!

'Jackass' star Johnny Knoxville has nothing left to prove

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People hold up signs and bags of Skittles candy during a rally in support of Trayvon Martin at Freedom Plaza in Washington, on Saturday, March 24, 2012. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Trayvon, ten years later

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