Andrea Gutierrez Andrea Gutierrez is an assistant producer on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders.
Andrea Gutierrez
Stories By

Andrea Gutierrez

Andrea Gutierrez
Andrea Gutierrez
Andrea Gutierrez

Andrea Gutierrez

Assistant Producer

Andrea Gutierrez (she/her) is an assistant producer on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders. She's drawn to stories at the intersections of gender, race, class and ability in arts and culture.

Gutierrez is a longtime storyteller with work in print, digital and audio. She got her start in radio producing interviews and features for The Frame, a daily arts and entertainment show on member station KPCC. Past bylines include BBC World Service, The Current (CBC), LAist, The California Sunday Magazine, Marfa Public Radio, Bitch, make/shift, Huizache and the Los Angeles Review of Books.

In 2019, Gutierrez was named an AIR New Voices Scholar and a finalist in member station KCRW's 24-Hour Radio Race. Prior to working in radio, she spent several years as a university administrator. She taught, counseled and mentored students at UC Berkeley, UCLA, UC Riverside and Cal State LA.

A lifelong Southern Californian, Gutierrez received her bachelor's degree in German studies at Scripps College and her MFA in creative nonfiction at the University of California, Riverside. She's an alum of the Transom Traveling Workshop and the VONA Voices Workshop for writers of color.

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Story Archive

The U.S. housing market is booming— who does that benefit? Charles Harker/Getty Images hide caption

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Charles Harker/Getty Images

Housing Boom For Whom? Plus, 'Ziwe' Premieres

The housing market is booming— but who actually benefits? Sam talks to Jerusalem Demsas, politics and policy fellow for Vox, about what so many are getting wrong about housing. Plus, Sam revisits his 2020 conversation with Ziwe Fumudoh, whose comedy variety show Ziwe premieres on Showtime on May 9. Then, in honor of NPR's 50th anniversary, Sam plays "Who Said That?" with All Things Considered hosts Audie Cornish and Ari Shapiro.

Housing Boom For Whom? Plus, 'Ziwe' Premieres

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People wait to receive COVID-19 vaccine in Mumbai, India, Thursday, April 29, 2021. India set another global record in new virus cases Thursday. Rajanish Kakade/AP hide caption

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Rajanish Kakade/AP

India And The Unequal Distribution Of Vaccines; Plus, 'Invisibilia' Returns

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Patti Harrison stars in Together Together as Anna, a young single woman who agrees to be a gestational surrogate for a single man in his 40s. Tiffany Roohani/Bleecker Street hide caption

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Tiffany Roohani/Bleecker Street

Patti Harrison Takes The Lead In 'Together Together'

Patti Harrison is known for bringing her absurd, caustic, yet charming comedy to supporting roles on shows like Search Party, Broad City and Shrill. But now she's in a starring role in the romantic comedy Together Together. In it, Harrison plays a young single woman who agrees to be a gestational surrogate for a single man in his 40s, played by Ed Helms. Sam talks to Patti about what it was like to play a role different from everything she's done before, why Together Together is even billed as a rom-com, and the quandary of representation as a trans woman.

Patti Harrison Takes The Lead In 'Together Together'

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Ashley Nicole Black talks with Sam Sanders. NPR hide caption

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NPR

The "Must-See TV" Of Black Trauma, Plus Ashley Nicole Black On Making Black Joy

Sam chats with NPR's TV critic Eric Deggans about constant images of Black pain in news and in entertainment. Then, he turns to comedian Ashley Nicole Black to talk about the new season of "A Black Lady Sketch Show" and Black joy.

The "Must-See TV" Of Black Trauma, Plus Ashley Nicole Black On Making Black Joy

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Sam Sanders chats with Eric André. NPR hide caption

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NPR

The Warped Reality of Eric André's 'Bad Trip'

Sam talks to actor and comedian Eric André about the evolution of the prank genre with his Netflix hidden-camera comedy Bad Trip. They chat about the complications of making a prank show while Black, who André would never prank, and why everyone could use a little absurdism to warp their realities.

The Warped Reality of Eric André's 'Bad Trip'

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Protesters gather outside the Brooklyn Center Police Department calling for justice for Daunte Wright on Wednesday, April 14, 2021 in Brooklyn Center, MN. Jason Armond/Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag hide caption

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Jason Armond/Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag

The 'Thin Blue Line' In Minnesota, Plus 'Tell Them, I Am'

What's it like to cover the Derek Chauvin trial against the backdrop of continued police violence? Guest host Ari Shapiro talks to Minnesota activist and journalist O'nika Nicole Craven. Then, he talks to Maurice Chammah, staff writer at The Marshall Project, about the origins and evolving symbolism of the thin blue line. Plus, Misha Euceph on the new season of her podcast Tell Them, I Am, and the many ways that Muslims find glimpses of God. Then, Mary Knauf, executive producer of Tell Them, I Am, joins Ari and Misha to play Who Said That.

The 'Thin Blue Line' In Minnesota, Plus 'Tell Them, I Am'

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African Methodist Episcopal Church Bishop Reginald Jackson announces a boycott of Coca-Cola Co. products outside the Georgia Capitol n Atlanta. Jackson says Coca-Cola and other large Georgia companies haven't done enough to oppose restrictive voting bills that Georgia lawmakers were debating as Jackson spoke. Jeff Amy/AP hide caption

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Jeff Amy/AP

What's The Strategy? Corporate Activism And Anti-Trans Bills

Corporations have spoken out against the new restrictive voting law in Georgia, but to what end? Sam talks to Slate writer Dahlia Lithwick about whether that tactic actually effects change—and whether it's just a performance. Plus, Sam talks to author and historian Jules Gill-Peterson about the historic flood of anti-trans bills in state legislatures and how these bills echo anti-gay rhetoric of the past. Then, friends of the show Saeed Jones and Zach Stafford join Sam to play Who Said That.

What's The Strategy? Corporate Activism And Anti-Trans Bills

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Is 'Diversity And Inclusion' Far From Its Roots? And What's An NFT?

Sam talks to Kim Tran, an anti-racist author and consultant, about her article in Harper's Bazaar on how the diversity, equity and inclusion industry has strayed from its movement roots. Plus, what's an NFT? And why are people buying them? And what are they again? Sam breaks it all down with tech reporters Bobby Allyn and Erin Griffith to explain the phenomenon of the non-fungible token — and whether it can last.

Is 'Diversity And Inclusion' Far From Its Roots? And What's An NFT?

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Star Samkus, who works at the King Soopers grocery store and knew three of the victims of a mass shooting at the store a day earlier, cries while kneeling in front of crosses placed in honor of the victims, Tuesday, March 23, 2021, in Boulder, Colo. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Gun Violence Never Went Away, Plus The Overlooked Talent Of Asian Actors

It might have seemed like mass shootings were down last year, but 2020 was actually one of the deadliest years for gun violence in decades. Sam talks to Abené Clayton, reporter for The Guardian, about why some shootings get more coverage than others. Plus, Sam talks to Shirley Li, staff writer at The Atlantic, about Minari and the way stereotypes inform how white audiences view the performances of Asian actors. Then, Hannah Giorgis, also of The Atlantic, joins Sam and Shirley to play Who Said That.

Gun Violence Never Went Away, Plus The Overlooked Talent Of Asian Actors

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Brittany K. Barnett is a lawyer, entrepreneur and author of the memoir A Knock at Midnight: A Story of Hope, Justice, and Freedom. Cydni Brown/Brittany K. Barnett hide caption

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Cydni Brown/Brittany K. Barnett

The Fight To Transform Criminal Justice

There are few paths to freedom for people serving life sentences in prison on federal drug charges. Guest host Ayesha Rascoe talks with Brittany K. Barnett, lawyer, entrepreneur and author of A Knock at Midnight: A Story of Hope, Justice, and Freedom, about her role in the fight to free incarcerated people from these sentences. They talk about high profile clemencies, how life sentences are handed down even without physical evidence of drugs, and the wealth of Black love.

The Fight To Transform Criminal Justice

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Kat Bagger shows her support for the Asian community as she stands in front of Gold Spa, one of three locations where deadly shootings happened at day spas, in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S. March 17, 2021. The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Im hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Im

A History Of Anti-Asian Racism, Plus 'Married At First Sight'

In the wake of Tuesday's mass shooting in Atlanta, guest host Ayesha Rascoe talks to critical race theorist and professor Jennifer Ho about the history behind anti-Asian racism and what it means to be an Asian woman in America. Then, Ayesha chats about her latest obsession, the reality dating show Married at First Sight, with fellow devotees Delece Smith-Barrow, education editor at Politico, and Brittany Luse, former co-host and executive producer of The Nod.

A History Of Anti-Asian Racism, Plus 'Married At First Sight'

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It's been one year since the spread of COVID-19 was classified as a pandemic. Solskin/Getty Images hide caption

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Solskin/Getty Images

Our Pandemic Year

We take stock of a year that challenged us emotionally, culturally and politically. Sam talks to Hira Deol, a former contestant on Big Brother Canada, about what it was like to learn about the pandemic while sequestered away from the outside world. Plus, Sam chats with culture writer Anne Helen Petersen about the gradual return to our "normal" lives — and just how messy it's going to be.

Our Pandemic Year

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People wait in line to vote at a polling station in front of Benson School District Board Room in Benson, Arizona on November 3, 2020. ARIANA DREHSLER/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ARIANA DREHSLER/AFP via Getty Images

Voting Rights Under Threat, Plus Do We Still Need Sports?

A new case before the U.S. Supreme Court could jeopardize the power of the Voting Rights Act. Sam talks to Mark Joseph Stern, staff writer for Slate, about what's at stake and how so much of the current debate goes back to Reconstruction. Sam also chats with contributing writer for The Atlantic and podcaster Jemele Hill about how tv viewership across almost all sports has tanked during the pandemic.

Voting Rights Under Threat, Plus Do We Still Need Sports?

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Golden Globe statuettes on display on January 6, 2009. Matt Sayles/AP hide caption

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Matt Sayles/AP

A Weird Awards Season, Plus "Anything for Selena"

What's an awards season when many theaters are still closed and it's harder to track which movies and shows deserve buzz? Louis Virtel and Ira Madison III, co-hosts of Keep It chat with Sam about who's being selected and who's being overlooked, and whether the pandemic further exposes awards' irrelevance or not. Plus, Sam talks with Maria Garcia about her podcast, Anything for Selena, and why honoring Selena is political.

A Weird Awards Season, Plus "Anything for Selena"

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