Sydney Lupkin Sydney Lupkin is the pharmaceuticals correspondent for NPR.
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Sydney Lupkin

Sydney Lupkin

Pharmaceuticals Correspondent

Sydney Lupkin is the pharmaceuticals correspondent for NPR.

She was most recently a correspondent at Kaiser Health News, where she covered drug prices and specialized in data reporting for its enterprise team. She's reported on how tainted drugs can reach consumers, how companies take advantage of rare disease drug rules and how FDA-approved generics often don't make it to market. She's also tracked pharmaceutical dollars to patient advocacy groups and members of Congress. Her work has won the National Press Club's Joan M. Friedenberg Online Journalism Award, the National Institute for Health Care Management's Digital Media Award and a health reporting award from the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing.

Lupkin graduated from Boston University. She's also worked for ABC News, VICE News, MedPage Today and The Bay Citizen. Her internship and part-time work includes stints at ProPublica, The Boston Globe, The Boston Herald, The New England Center for Investigative Reporting and WCVB.

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Story Archive

Remdesivir 101: What Is This Drug, Are There Alternatives And How Much Might It Cost?

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Remdesivir, an experimental antiviral drug made by Gilead Sciences, has been authorized by the Food and Drug Administration for emergency use in treating severely ill COVID-19 patients. Ulrich Perry/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ulrich Perry/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Putting A Price On COVID-19 Treatment Remdesivir

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Gilead Sciences CEO Daniel O'Day speaks at a meeting with President Trump and members of the White House coronavirus task force on March 2. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Only 28% of the factories that make active ingredients for pharmaceuticals for the domestic market are located in the U.S., according to the Food and Drug Administration. Ariana Lindquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ariana Lindquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A phlebotomist draws blood from a patient participating in a clinical trial for a cancer treatment. With hospitals focused on COVID-19, hundreds of studies are being put on hold. Jim West/Science Source hide caption

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Jim West/Science Source

Coronavirus Pandemic Brings Hundreds Of U.S. Clinical Trials To A Halt

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A scientist works in a lab at Moderna in Cambridge, Mass., in February. Moderna has developed an experimental coronavirus medicine, but an approved treatment could be more than a year away. David L. Ryan/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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David L. Ryan/Boston Globe via Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration has authorized two malaria drugs — chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine — to be added to the national emergency stockpile for use in responding to COVID-19. Photo Illustration by John Phillips/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo Illustration by John Phillips/Getty Images

After the Food and Drug Administration granted Gilead Sciences orphan drug status for its experimental drug remdesivir on Tuesday, Gilead asked that the agency rescind that status Wednesday. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Gilead Sciences, headquartered in Foster City, Calif., makes remdesivir, one of the experimental drugs now being investigated as a possible treatment for COVID-19. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Might The Experimental Drug Remdesivir Work Against COVID-19?

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Doctors Experiment With Existing Medicines To Find COVID-19 Cure

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