Sydney Lupkin Sydney Lupkin is the pharmaceuticals correspondent for NPR.
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Sydney Lupkin

Sydney Lupkin

Pharmaceuticals Correspondent

Sydney Lupkin is the pharmaceuticals correspondent for NPR.

She was most recently a correspondent at Kaiser Health News, where she covered drug prices and specialized in data reporting for its enterprise team. She's reported on how tainted drugs can reach consumers, how companies take advantage of rare disease drug rules and how FDA-approved generics often don't make it to market. She's also tracked pharmaceutical dollars to patient advocacy groups and members of Congress. Her work has won the National Press Club's Joan M. Friedenberg Online Journalism Award, the National Institute for Health Care Management's Digital Media Award and a health reporting award from the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing.

Lupkin graduated from Boston University. She's also worked for ABC News, VICE News, MedPage Today and The Bay Citizen. Her internship and part-time work includes stints at ProPublica, The Boston Globe, The Boston Herald, The New England Center for Investigative Reporting and WCVB.

Story Archive

What you need to know about the COVID-19 omicron variant

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COVID vaccines are set to be among the most lucrative pharmaceutical products ever

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Pfizer says it will share the rights to its COVID-19 pill

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A hormone-blocking drug implant was prescribed for an active 8-year-old girl diagnosed with central precocious puberty. The price of one option was thousands of dollars less than the other. Kristina Barker for KHN hide caption

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Kristina Barker for KHN

Drugmaker drops cheaper version of drug, leaving patients stuck with pricier one

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With an off-label drug discontinued, families' other option costs thousands more

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Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, second from right, speaks during a news conference on Operation Warp Speed in January, 2021. With Azar from left are Dr. Moncef Slaoui, chief science adviser to Operation Warp Speed, Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and U.S. Army Gen. Gustave Perna, chief operating officer of Operation Warp Speed. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Health care providers who administer a COVID-19 vaccine "off-label" face legal liability, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns. Luis Alvarez/Getty Images hide caption

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Then-Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar (left) and President Donald Trump listen as Moncef Slaoui of Operation Warp Speed speaks about the crash program to develop a COVID-19 vaccine in the White House Rose Garden in May 2020. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The U.S. Paid Billions To Get Enough COVID Vaccines Last Fall. What Went Wrong?

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Federal health officials are planning ahead to give booster shots in the fall to all U.S. adults, starting with those who were vaccinated early on, like the elderly, health care workers and first responders. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks, R-Iowa, listens as Robert Kramer, president and chief executive officer of Emergent BioSolutions, testifies during a Wednesday hearing of the House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Patents Are Just One Piece Of The Global Vaccine Manufacturing Problem

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U.S. Backs Waiving International Patent Protections For COVID Vaccines

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Doses of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine will drop by 86% next week after one of the company's manufacturers released a stockpile and those have been distributed. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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States Will Have 86% Fewer Johnson & Johnson Doses Next Week Than It Did This Week

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Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Batch Ruined At Baltimore Factory, Drug Giant Says

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