Alana Wise Alana Wise covers race and identity for NPR's National Desk.
Stories By

Alana Wise

Alana Wise

Politics Reporter

Alana Wise covers race and identity for NPR's National Desk.

Before joining NPR, Alana covered beats including American gun culture, the aviation business and the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Through her reporting, Alana has covered such events as large protests, mass shootings, boardroom uprisings and international trade fights.

Alana is a graduate of Howard University in Washington, D.C., and an Atlanta native.

Story Archive

Tyrone Ferrens, a plant electrician at Under Armour, sits for a portrait in his house in Aberdeen, Md. Shuran Huang/For NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Shuran Huang/For NPR

A Black family in Maryland navigates the pandemic and inflation with some success

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1109306470/1109323622" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A Black family in Maryland is navigating the economic strain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1108843781/1108843782" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Demonstrators carry a scroll listing the names of people killed by police during a march in honor of George Floyd on March 7, 2021 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

On 2nd anniversary of George Floyd's killing, Black Buffalo residents feel the weight

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1101135486/1101162448" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

It's been 2 years since George Floyd was murdered by police in Minneapolis

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1101141297/1101141298" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Journalist who wrote about gun violence was killed in mass shooting in Buffalo

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1100898018/1100898019" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People embrace near a memorial for the shooting victims outside of Tops grocery store on May 20, 2022 in Buffalo, New York. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Buffalo plagued by economic neglect, segregation long before shooting, residents say

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1100574675/1100673082" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Buffalo shooting exposes the city's economic disparities

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1100614920/1100614921" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rev. Denise O. Walden-Glenn and Alia Williams each raise a fist— a symbol of solidarity and Black power— at the VOICE office in Buffalo, New York. Alana Wise/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Alana Wise/NPR

After the Buffalo slayings, parents struggle through talks with their children

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099980320/1100019830" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Talking to parents and children about the shooting in Buffalo

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099873997/1099873998" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Matt Reeves, a former employee of Montpelier who was fired this week, is pictured outside of the historic Gilmore cabin at Montpelier. Alana Wise/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Alana Wise/NPR

Montpelier says it's open to parity with slave descendants. Descendants call foul

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1093673939/1094475680" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Composite image of Will Smith, Jada Pinkett Smith, and Chris rock at the 94th Oscars at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, California on March 27, 2022. Angela Weiss/Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Angela Weiss/Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA - MARCH 27: Jada Pinkett Smith attends the 94th Annual Academy Awards at Hollywood and Highland on March 27, 2022 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images) Mike Coppola/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Coppola/Getty Images

Law students from Southern University Law Center traveled from Baton Rouge, LA, to support Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson at a rally outside the U.S. Capitol on March 21, 2022 in Washington, DC. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Law students praise Ketanji Brown Jackson's poise at the Senate hearings

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1088735156/1088831837" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">