Alana Wise Alana Wise covers race and identity for NPR's National Desk.
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Alana Wise

Alana Wise

Politics Reporter

Alana Wise covers race and identity for NPR's National Desk.

Before joining NPR, Alana covered beats including American gun culture, the aviation business and the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Through her reporting, Alana has covered such events as large protests, mass shootings, boardroom uprisings and international trade fights.

Alana is a graduate of Howard University in Washington, D.C., and an Atlanta native.

Story Archive

Donald Glover, Zazie Beetz and Brian Tyree Henry star in Atlanta. Guy D'Alema/FX hide caption

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Guy D'Alema/FX

Democratic candidate for governor Wes Moore speaks during a rally with President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden during a rally on the eve of the midterm elections, at Bowie State University in Bowie, Md., on Nov. 7. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Wes Moore, the Maryland Democratic nominee for governor, speaks The Adele H. Stamp Student Union Center for Campus Life at the University of Maryland College Park, Md., on Oct. 26, 2022. Kyna Uwaeme for NPR hide caption

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Kyna Uwaeme for NPR

Wes Moore looks to make history as Maryland's first Black governor

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People who use hair straightening chemicals have an increased risk of cancer

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Wrongful convictions disproportionately affect Black Americans, report shows

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A person walks down a street in Philadelphia, Pa. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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A quarter of U.S. adults fear being attacked in their neighborhood, a poll finds

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More than a quarter of U.S. adults say they fear being attacked in their neighborhood

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Marchelle Tigner, a firearms instructor, teaches a student how to shoot a gun during a 2017 class in Lawrenceville, Ga. Tigner's goal is to train 1 million women how to shoot a gun in her lifetime. She is among the nation's Black women gun owners who say they are picking up firearms for self-protection. Lisa Marie Pane/AP hide caption

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Lisa Marie Pane/AP

Tyrone Ferrens, a plant electrician at Under Armour, sits for a portrait in his house in Aberdeen, Md. Shuran Huang/For NPR hide caption

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A Black family in Maryland navigates the pandemic and inflation with some success

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A Black family in Maryland is navigating the economic strain

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