Hafsa Fathima
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Hafsa Fathima

Hafsa Fathima

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Coronavirus is complicating an already lengthy process for immigrants to the U.S. American consulates and embassies have curtailed operations. And last week President Trump, citing the pandemic, extended a freeze on green cards for new immigrants and suspended certain work visas for foreign workers. Belterz / Getty Images hide caption

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Belterz / Getty Images

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 12: Black Lives Matter supporters are seen on the roof of a van during a rally in Trafalgar Square on June 12, 2020 in London, United Kingdom. (Photo by Peter Summers/Getty Images) Peter Summers/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Summers/Getty Images

Lessons About Racism from 'Cops' and 'Gone With The Wind'

The killing of George Floyd has inspired global protests against police brutality, and it seems like everyone has something to say, including the entertainment industry. Sam's joined by NPR television critic Eric Deggans and Tonya Mosley, co-host of NPR/WBUR's Here & Now and host of the KQED podcast Truth Be Told. They talk about the cancellation of the long-running reality TV show Cops, the removal of Gone With the Wind from HBO Max, and what it all says about this moment. After that, Sam chats with Rev. Jacqui Lewis, senior minister at Middle Collegiate Church in Manhattan, and Rev. angel Kyodo williams, a Zen priest. They talk about what Black people and white people should be doing differently now and give Sam a bit of sermon.

Lessons About Racism from 'Cops' and 'Gone With The Wind'

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Republican Party members wave placards bearing the name 'Nixon', in support of Richard Nixon, at the 1968 Republican National Convention, in Miami Beach, Florida. Archive Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Archive Photos/Getty Images

Demonstrators raise their fists in downtown Los Angeles on June 3, during a protest over the death of George Floyd. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Not Just Another Protest

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A worker wears a protective glove as he takes money from a moviegoer at a ticket booth at Mission Tiki drive-in theater in Montclair, Calif., Thursday, May 28, 2020. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Money and Coronavirus; Samantha Irby On Judge Mathis

The coronavirus pandemic has us worrying not only about our health, but also about money. Sam talks to CBS News business analyst Jill Schlesinger, about the current economic crisis and how it's affecting different generations. Then, Sam talks to writer Samantha Irby about her newsletter "Who's On Judge Mathis Today?," which recaps the foibles of the syndicated daytime court show Judge Mathis.

Money and Coronavirus; Samantha Irby On Judge Mathis

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Residents of the Living Memory Care and assisted living home of Vadnais Heights have a heroes work here sign put up for the health care workers that take care of them every day. (Photo by: Michael Siluk) Michael Siluk/Education Images/Universal Image hide caption

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Michael Siluk/Education Images/Universal Image

WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 7: Chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., gives his closing remarks at a Senate Health Education Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on new coronavirus tests May 7th, 2020 on Capitol Hill in Washington DC. (Photo by Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images) Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: Back To Capitol Hill

Politics may not be the first thing on minds right now, but it's still happening. With the Senate returning to session this week, Sam checks in to see how Capitol Hill is operating safely. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis discusses how congressional members are taking precautions, while NPR White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe explains how President Trump's election rallies could possibly continue with social distancing in place. Then, Sam calls up an artist in Sweden — which hasn't imposed strict lockdown measures— to find out what everyday life now looks like.

Weekly Wrap: Back To Capitol Hill

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Movie theaters remain closed as stay-at-home orders continue in many parts of the U.S. due to the coronavirus pandemic. Chris Pizzello/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/AP

TV, Movies And Coronavirus

The coronavirus pandemic is affecting all parts of the entertainment industry. Sam talks to writer and comedian Jenny Yang and camera operator Jessica Hershatter, whose jobs are on hold due to shutdowns. Also, Sam and LA Times entertainment reporter Meredith Blake discuss television and streaming. And joining Sam for a special edition of Who Said That is Shea Serrano, staff writer for The Ringer and author of the book Movies (and Other Things).

TV, Movies And Coronavirus

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These images depict high traffic locations that are currently deserted because of Stay-at-Home order in Los Angeles. Robert LeBlanc/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert LeBlanc/Getty Images

Joey Rodriguez installs an advertising banner in front of Chase Field, home of the Arizona Diamondbacks, March 26, 2020, in Phoenix. The start of the MLB regular season is indefinitely on hold because of the coronavirus pandemic. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Weekly Wrap: Sports On Hold, And Your Productivity Too

The coronavirus has completely reshaped the world of sports. Sam talks to ESPN senior writer and ESPN Daily host Mina Kimes and The Undefeated columnist Clinton Yates about how different professional leagues are dealing with the pandemic. Also, BuzzFeed senior culture writer Anne Helen Petersen chats with Sam about our obsession with productivity in quarantine times.

Weekly Wrap: Sports On Hold, And Your Productivity Too

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People walk past posters encouraging participation in the 2020 Census, Wednesday, April 1, 2020, in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Weekly Wrap: Yes, The Census Is Still Happening

The census comes but once a decade, and this time it's in the midst of a pandemic. Code Switch co-hosts Gene Demby and Shereen Marisol Meraji talk it out with Sam. Also, hospitals have been dramatically changed by the coronavirus, but babies still need to be delivered. Sam talks to one mom-to-be whose birth plans have been upended by the crisis.

Weekly Wrap: Yes, The Census Is Still Happening

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A job fair in Omaha, Neb., on April 1, 2020, was reconfigured as a drive-through event due to the coronavirus outbreak. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

Weekly Wrap: A Jobs Crisis, And It's No One's Fault

The coronavirus is taking a toll on jobs and the economy. Sam talks to NPR's Cardiff Garcia and Stacey Vanek Smith, co-hosts of The Indicator from Planet Money, about ways to get people paid while they're out of work and the necessity for businesses to pivot to stay afloat. Also, Sam and NPR music news editor Sidney Madden talk about new ways people are listening to music and partying online in "club quarantine."

Weekly Wrap: A Jobs Crisis, And It's No One's Fault

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Then Senator and presidential candidate Barack Obama delivers his speech 'A More Perfect Union,' in Philadelphia on March 18, 2008. Matt Rourke/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Matt Rourke/ASSOCIATED PRESS