Meghan Collins Sullivan Meghan Collins Sullivan is a senior editor on the Arts & Culture Desk, overseeing non-fiction books coverage at NPR.
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Meghan Collins Sullivan

Meghan Collins Sullivan

Senior Editor

Meghan Collins Sullivan is a senior editor on the Arts & Culture Desk, overseeing non-fiction books coverage at NPR. She has worked at NPR over the last 13 years in various capacities, including as the supervising editor for NPR.org – managing a team of online producers and reporters and editing multi-platform news coverage. She was also lead editor for the 13.7: Cosmos and Culture blog, written by five scientists on topics related to the intersection of science and culture.

In 2011, Meghan was one of six U.S. journalists awarded a Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Fellowship grant, with which she reported on challenges faced by abandoned children in Romania two decades after the fall of communism.

Prior to working with NPR, Meghan was assistant managing editor and deputy editor of the Washington Post's website, supervising the 24/7 breaking news desk. She also previously reported for CNN/Money and has written for other news outlets — including the Washington Post, National Geographic, Time, World Affairs and The Financial Times — from Mexico and Central Europe, as well as in the U.S. She graduated from College of the Holy Cross and earned a master's degree from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University.

Story Archive

A golden arch marks the entrance to Nu Boyana Film Studios, nestled into the side of Vitosha Mountain in Sofia. Meghan Collins Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Meghan Collins Sullivan/NPR

As COVID-19 Mostly Halted Filming In The U.S., Movie Magic Forged Ahead In Bulgaria

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People wait in front of the hospital of the Military Medical Academy in Sofia, Bulgaria, on Feb. 21 for a COVID-19 vaccination. NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Former President Barack Obama speaks during a drive-in campaign rally for Joe Biden on Oct. 31 in Flint, Michigan. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

On The Days Before The Raid To Kill Osama Bin Laden

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Hear Yves-Emmanuel Segui leave a voicemail for his daughter Chloe

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Health care workers light candles outside Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City on April 10 as they mourn and remember their colleagues who have died during the COVID-19 pandemic. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Edward Snowden appears on a live video feed broadcast from Moscow at an event sponsored by the ACLU Hawaii in Honolulu on Feb. 14, 2015. Marco Garcia/AP hide caption

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Marco Garcia/AP

Edward Snowden Tells NPR: The Executive Branch 'Sort Of Hacked The Constitution'

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Former first lady Michelle Obama's new book Becoming was published in November. Chuck Kennedy/NPR hide caption

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Chuck Kennedy/NPR

Tell-Alls, Dramatic Warnings And The Obamas Lead Political Books Of 2018

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