Jonaki Mehta Jonaki Mehta is a producer for All Things Considered.
Jonaki Mehta
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Jonaki Mehta

Harry Gibbons/NPR
Jonaki Mehta
Harry Gibbons/NPR

Jonaki Mehta

Producer, All Things Considered

Jonaki Mehta is a producer for All Things Considered. Before ATC, she worked at Neon Hum Media where she produced a documentary series and talk show. Prior to that, Mehta was a producer at Member station KPCC and director/associate producer at Marketplace Morning Report, where she helped shape the morning's business news.

Mehta's first job in radio was at NPR West as a National Desk intern. Her career really began when she was nine years old and insisted that the local county paper give Mehta her very own column. (She didn't get the job, but her very patient mother did somehow get her a meeting with the editor-in-chief.) Outside of work, she loves making recipes with harvests from her vegetable garden and riding her motorcycle around L.A.

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Story Archive

A house designed by Paul R. Williams in La Cañada Flintridge, Calif. The first licensed Black architect west of the Mississippi, Williams was known for using curves to create a sense of intimacy, even in grand spaces. Janna Ireland hide caption

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Janna Ireland

'Regarding Paul R. Williams' Honors Legacy Of LA's Barrier-Breaking Black Architect

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A field trip to the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C., led by Kimberly Grayson, the principal of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Early College in Denver, inspired some of her students to demand a more inclusive school curriculum. Chemetra Keys hide caption

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Chemetra Keys

Denver School Principal On How Black Students Led Swift Changes To History Curriculum

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Pirette McKamey has spent more than three decades as an educator. Currently the principal at Mission High School in San Francisco, McKamey says being an anti-racist educator means committing to "all of the students sitting in front of me, including Black and Latinx students." Charles Warren hide caption

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Charles Warren

Veteran Educator On The Endless But 'Joyful' Work Of Creating Anti-Racist Education

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Black Students Matter demonstrators march en route to a rally at the Department of Education in Washington, D.C., on June 19. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images

Effective Anti-Racist Education Requires More Diverse Teachers, More Training

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Yasmine Gateau for NPR

Why U.S. Schools Are Still Segregated — And One Idea To Help Change That

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On June 14, an estimated 15,000 people gathered in Brooklyn to rally for Black trans lives in the Brooklyn Liberation march. Imara Jones/Courtesy Imara Jones hide caption

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Imara Jones/Courtesy Imara Jones

What Happened For Black Transgender People When Police Protests And Pride Converged

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The musicians on Not Our First Goat Rodeo, from left to right: Yo-Yo Ma, Chris Thile, Stuart Duncan and Edgar Meyer. Josh Goleman/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Josh Goleman/Courtesy of the artist

Yo-Yo Ma: Goats, Rodeos And The Power Of Music

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Bruce Patton (left), Gilbert Johnson and Marqueece Harris-Dawson share their perspectives on living in South LA during the unrest of previous decades and today. Bethany Mollenkof for NPR and Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Bethany Mollenkof for NPR and Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

3 Visions For The Future Of Police In South LA

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Parkview Early Learning Center in Spokane, Wash., has been operating at one-third capacity under pandemic guidelines. Co-owner Luc Jasmin III says it has been tough to turn away parents, many of whom are essential workers. Kathryn Garras hide caption

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Kathryn Garras

Emerson Weber, a 5th grader in South Dakota, is an avid letter writer whose thank-you note to her mail carrier went viral. Hugh Weber hide caption

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Hugh Weber

An 11-Year-Old Girl Writes To Thank Her Mailman. Postal Workers Write Back

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Alaska Restaurant Owner: Reopening Far From Profitable, But Still Worth It

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The title of Fiona Apple's Fetch the Bolt Cutters started as a line from a TV crime drama, but became the album's central message: "Fetch your tool of liberation. Set yourself free," Apple says. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

'Fetch Your Tool Of Liberation': Fiona Apple On Setting Herself Free

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Quail in dandelion's nest — one of Pascal Baudar's wild-crafted culinary creations. "So many wild plants, so little time," says Baudar. He leads foraging expeditions in the forests of Los Angeles and works with chefs to create meals based on wild foods. Courtesy of Pascal Baudar hide caption

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Courtesy of Pascal Baudar

Urban Foraging: Unearthing The Wildcrafted Flavors Of Los Angeles

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Oil rigs extract petroleum in Culver City, Calif., on May 16, 2008. Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images

Before Hollywood, The Oil Industry Made LA

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