Christopher Intagliata Christopher Intagliata is an editor at All Things Considered.
Christopher Intagliata
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Christopher Intagliata

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Christopher Intagliata
Leese Katsnelson /NPR

Christopher Intagliata

Editor, All Things Considered

Christopher Intagliata is an editor at All Things Considered, where he writes news and edits interviews with politicians, musicians, restaurant owners, scientists and many of the other voices heard on the air.

Before joining NPR, Intagliata spent more than a decade covering space, microbes, physics and more at the public radio show Science Friday. As senior producer and editor, he set overall program strategy, managed the production team and organized the show's national event series. He also helped oversee the development and launch of Science Friday's narrative podcasts Undiscovered and Science Diction.

While reporting, Intagliata has skated Olympic ice, shadowed NASA astronaut hopefuls across Hawaiian lava and hunted for beetles inside dung patties on the Kansas prairie. He also reports regularly for Scientific American, and was a 2015 Woods Hole Ocean Science Journalism fellow.

Prior to becoming a journalist, Intagliata taught English to bankers and soldiers in Verona, Italy, and traversed the Sierra Nevada backcountry as a field biologist, on the lookout for mountain yellow-legged frogs.

Intagliata has a master's degree in science journalism from New York University, and a bachelor's degree in biology and Italian from the University of California, Berkeley. He grew up in Orange, Calif., and is based at NPR West in Culver City.

Story Archive

Why the key change has disappeared from top-charting tunes

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Pakistan's Foreign Minister says the climate 'loss and damage fund' is a victory

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'Ronnabyte' and 'Quettabyte' are the new terms to describe large amounts of data

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The Big Burn podcast explores the history and state of wildfire management today

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As Twitter's workforce crumbles, users are tweeting their eulogies for the platform

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White House climate advisor addresses the unresolved questions left after COP27

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Researchers find rats move to the same tempos in music that humans like

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If you dance more when the bass hits, it could be because of your vestibular system. Flashpop/Getty Images hide caption

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What makes us dance? It really is all about that bass

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Swamp pop artist Tommy McLain on his new album, "I Ran Down Every Dream"

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Are octopuses deliberately throwing things at each other?

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Inaudible, low-frequency bass makes people boogie more on the dancefloor

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Author Andrew Weiss on his graphic novel, "Accidental Czar"

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Why astronomers say you shouldn't miss Tuesday's total lunar eclipse

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Debris from another Chinese satellite launch fell uncontrolled back to Earth

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