Courtney Dorning Courtney Dorning is a Senior Editor for NPR's All Things Considered.
Courtney Dorning
Stories By

Courtney Dorning

Courtney Dorning

Senior Editor, All Things Considered

Courtney Dorning has been a Senior Editor for NPR's All Things Considered since November 2018. In that role, she's the lead editor for the daily show. Dorning is responsible for newsmaker interviews, lead news segments and the small, quirky features that are a hallmark of the network's flagship afternoon magazine program.

Dorning has been the editor on interviews ranging from former First Lady Michelle Obama, actress and activist Jane Fonda and Speaker of the House. She contributes heavily to All Things Considered's political coverage and has played a key role in the show's coverage of the #MeToo movement. Previously, Dorning was an editor at Morning Edition.

Prior to joining NPR, she spent nearly ten years at ABC News as a researcher and producer. Dorning helped produce town meetings from Israel in 2000 and 2002, and was a key part of Nightline's award-winning coverage of Sept. 11 and the Iraq war.

Dorning lives just outside Washington, D.C., with her husband, three children and a black lab. Having a singleton and twins in 18 months has sharpened the multi-tasking skills and nerves of steel that are essential for editing two hours of daily live programming.

Dorning is a graduate of Saint Mary's College and has a master's degree from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

Story Archive

Former army general on how the U.S. could back a Ukranian insurgency against Russia

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Europe braces for the omicron wave

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Writer Gwen Kirby on debut collection and how being a complicated woman is empowering

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Public health experts say most of us will get COVID-19. What does that mean?

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Rethinking school safety in the age of omicron

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At one Texas prison, men are building community through radio

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Sen. Warnock says voting rights legislation is a moral issue

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Rep. Jamie Raskin on growing through trauma in year since Jan. 6 and his son's death

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Left to right: President Donald Trump speaks at the Stop the Steal rally. A member of a pro-Trump mob shatters a window with his fist from inside the U.S. Capitol building after breaking in. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi presides over a joint session of Congress to certify the 2020 Electoral College vote count. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images; Jon Cherry/Getty Images; Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images; Jon Cherry/Getty Images; Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

A timeline of how the Jan. 6 attack unfolded — including who said what and when

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After snowstorm, hundreds are stranded on I-95, including Virginia Senator Tim Kaine

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During the Jan. 6 riot chaos, lawmakers called on military and intelligence training

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What happened when during the Jan. 6 insurrection? Here's a timeline of events

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Child hunger is expected to worsen

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Many teachers thought 2021 was going to be a better school year than 2020, but a lot have found it to be harder as students are struggling to catch up after a year of remote and hybrid learning. Michael Loccisano/Getty Images hide caption

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Teachers thought 2021 would be better. Instead, some say it's their toughest year yet

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