Jordana Hochman
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Jordana Hochman

Jordana Hochman

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Angela Hsieh

The Jackson 5. Bruce Talamon/Taschen hide caption

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Bruce Talamon/Taschen

Bruce Talamon on photographing Black excellence in the 1970s

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Singer and songwriter Phoebe Bridgers talks to Sam Sanders. NPR hide caption

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NPR

Phoebe Bridgers makes her lyrics specific for a reason

Singer Phoebe Bridgers had a huge year in 2020. She was nominated for four Grammys for her work on her album Punisher. The album was released to wide critical acclaim. But like the rest of us, Bridgers was stuck at home. So what's that really like for a musician? In the latest episode of our summer music series, we revisit Sam Sanders' conversation with Phoebe from 2020. They talk about her love/hate relationship with touring, how she aims for the universal in the specificity of her lyrics, and her hopes for the future of music.

Phoebe Bridgers makes her lyrics specific for a reason

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Yebba's standalone album is called Dawn. Francesco Carrozzini/RCA Records hide caption

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Francesco Carrozzini/RCA Records

Danielle Lindemann, author of True Story: What Reality TV Says About Us. Cyndi Shattuck/FSG hide caption

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Cyndi Shattuck/FSG

'True Story': Danielle Lindemann on 'What Reality TV Says About Us'

In this special new episode of It's Been a Minute, we share a conversation Sam Sanders recorded about one of his favorite things: reality TV. He's joined by Danielle Lindemann, author of True Story: What Reality TV Says About Us, to discuss the genre's origins in Real World and Survivor, how reality TV influences our culture, and why we should all take the genre more seriously.

'True Story': Danielle Lindemann on 'What Reality TV Says About Us'

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Two people sitting on a bench wearing protective masks using their phones as the coronavirus continues to spread across the United States on March 27, 2020 in New York City. Cindy Ord/Getty Images hide caption

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Cindy Ord/Getty Images

Lee Minho as Hansu and Minha Kim as Sunja in "Pachinko" (Apple TV+) Apple TV Plus hide caption

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Apple TV Plus

Bringing 'Pachinko' from page to the screen

Elise Hu chats with Soo Hugh, writer and showrunner of the much anticipated series Pachinko, based on the 2017 novel by Min Jin Lee. It's the epic story of a family through four generations across the 20th century, all about their lives as Zainichi Koreans in Japan. In this chat, Hugh talks about what it was like to bring the beloved book to screen, what she's is doing to support Asian American creators coming up behind her, and why this story resonates with people of all backgrounds.

Bringing 'Pachinko' from page to the screen

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Overview of the Oscar statue at "Meet the Oscars" at the Time Warner Center on February 25, 2010 in New York City. Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images

And the Oscar goes to...

A trimmed telecast? A crowd-sourced award? DJ Khaled as a presenter? The Oscars are back like you've never seen them before. Guest host Elise Hu is joined by Pop Culture Happy Hour host and reporter Aisha Harris and NPR film critic Bob Mondello to talk about these new changes and their top picks for who's taking home the big awards of the night. Then, they play a game of Who Said That.

And the Oscar goes to...

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Author Julissa Arce makes the case for rejecting assimilation in her latest book, You Sound Like a White Girl. Aly Honore hide caption

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Aly Honore

Rejecting assimilation in 'You Sound Like a White Girl'

A school crush once told Julissa Arce that she sounded "like a white girl." At the time, Arce believed that was exactly what she wanted. But over the years, even after perfecting "accent-less" English, graduating from college, getting a job at Goldman Sachs, and becoming an American citizen, Arce still felt like she didn't belong. Instead of just trying to fit in as the solution, Arce began to question whether that was the very problem to begin with. Elise Hu talks to Arce about her new book — You Sound Like a White Girl — and the case for rejecting assimilation in favor of embracing yourself, your history, and your culture.

Rejecting assimilation in 'You Sound Like a White Girl'

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ATLANTA, GA - MARCH 18: A year ago, activists demonstrate outside Gold Spa the shooting where three women were gunned down on in Atlanta, Georgia. Megan Varner/Getty Images hide caption

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Megan Varner/Getty Images

One year later, the Atlanta spa shootings; plus, tech on TV

It's been one year since the Atlanta-area spa shootings that claimed eight lives, six of whom were Asian women. Guest host Elise Hu reflects on the event with Nicole Chung, author of the memoir All You Can Ever Know and a contributing writer for The Atlantic. They discuss their own experiences and the unprecedented violence that Asian Americans—especially Asian American women—are facing.

One year later, the Atlanta spa shootings; plus, tech on TV

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Sam Sanders says goodbye to NPR. Josh Huskin/Josh Huskin hide caption

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Josh Huskin/Josh Huskin

Sam says goodbye

It's Been A Minute is sticking around, but before our beloved Sam Sanders takes flight we've got news to cover! In Sam's last episode as host, he's joined by NPR Weekend Edition Sunday host Ayesha Rascoe and NPR Congressional Correspondent Susan Davis to talk about the latest in politics news from gas prices to Ukraine to the upcoming US midterms. He then plays a special game of Who Said That? with his Aunt Betty and her friend, Lynette Maxwell.

Sam says goodbye

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Congregation Beth Israel synagogue in Colleyville, Texas. In January, an armed man stormed into the synagogue and held four people hostage for more than 10 hours. Emil Lippe/Getty Images hide caption

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Emil Lippe/Getty Images

The trouble with defining antisemitism

With more extreme antisemitic attacks on the rise and more antisemitic rhetoric in the mainstream, antisemitism has become an increasingly pressing issue in the US. But at the same time, the conversation around antisemitism is getting more fraught. Sam talks with Dov Waxman, professor and director for the UCLA Y&S Nazarian Center for Israel Studies, about what people are getting wrong about antisemitism. They discuss why there's so much contention around what the term means, why it can be hard to talk about, and how to fight antisemitism when it happens.

The trouble with defining antisemitism

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Women look at a screen displaying exchange rate at a currency exchange office in St. Petersburg, Russia, Tuesday, March 1, 2022. In the days since the West imposed sanctions on Russia over its invasion of Ukraine, ordinary Russians are feeling the painful effects — from payment systems that won't operate and problems withdrawing cash to not being able to purchase certain items. Dmitri Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Dmitri Lovetsky/AP

Sanctions 101

In the wake of Russia's invasion of Ukraine, global powers have put the pressure on with sanctions upon sanctions. But what does that even mean? Class is in session as Sam attends Sanctions 101 with Cardiff Garcia, host of The New Bazaar, and Stacey Vanek Smith, co-host of The Indicator. They talk about how economic sanctions are supposed to work and whether they can be effective enough to change anything on the ground.

Sanctions 101

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Johnny Knoxville gets hit by a bull in his latest film Jackass Forever. Sean Cliver/Courtesy of Paramount Pictures hide caption

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Sean Cliver/Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

'Jackass' star Johnny Knoxville has nothing left to prove

It's our 500th episode and what better way to celebrate than with Johnny Knoxville's first appearance on NPR? We couldn't think of a better milestone. In this episode, Sam and Johnny chat about his latest Jackass endeavor with Jackass Forever while also looking back at the reality show that started it all — and how its very first stunt actually shut down production. They also discuss Jackass' queer fanbase and Johnny's time in therapy. Come for the talk about raunchy stunts, stay for the Johnny Knoxville School of Radical Acceptance!

'Jackass' star Johnny Knoxville has nothing left to prove

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People hold up signs and bags of Skittles candy during a rally in support of Trayvon Martin at Freedom Plaza in Washington, on Saturday, March 24, 2012. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Trayvon, ten years later

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