Jordana Hochman
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Jordana Hochman

Jordana Hochman

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Vaccine Disinformation For Hire; Plus, Hannah Waddingham Of 'Ted Lasso'

Disinformation about COVID-19 vaccines abounds on social media, but there's more to it than meets the eye. Sam talks to Max Fisher, international reporter for the New York Times, about "disinformation for hire" and what social media platforms are doing to combat it. Plus, Sam talks to actress Hannah Waddingham, one of the stars of Ted Lasso. They're also joined by fellow cast member Jeremy Swift to play Who Said That.

Vaccine Disinformation For Hire; Plus, Hannah Waddingham Of 'Ted Lasso'

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Actress and author Emilia Clarke. Robert Ascroft/Narrative PR hide caption

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Robert Ascroft/Narrative PR

Emilia Clarke On Mothers Of Madness And Dragons

The "Mother of Dragons" is out with a new comic book, Mother of Madness. Actress Emilia Clarke talks with guest host Ayesha Rascoe about superpowers in real life and fantasy, her career-launching role in Game of Thrones and how Hollywood has changed since her first season as Daenerys.

Emilia Clarke On Mothers Of Madness And Dragons

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Sonequa Martin-Green attends the premiere of Warner Bros Space Jam: A New Legacy at Regal LA Live on July 12, 2021 in Los Angeles, California. Amy Sussman/FilmMagic via Getty Images hide caption

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Amy Sussman/FilmMagic via Getty Images

A "Help Wanted" sign posted in Brooklyn New York. Gabriela Bhaskar/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriela Bhaskar/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Why Workers Are Quitting; Plus The Comfort Of Horror Movies

Americans are quitting their jobs in record numbers. Guest host Ayesha Rascoe brings on CBS MoneyWatch editor Irina Ivanova to break down some of the reasons why. Then, The New Republic staff writer Jo Livingstone joins Ayesha to discuss the current state of horror movies and why nothing's better than a good scare. Author and Big Mood, Little Mood podcast host Daniel Lavery joins them to play Who Said That.

Why Workers Are Quitting; Plus The Comfort Of Horror Movies

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Donald Trump mocks Christine Blasey Ford's testimony during a rally in Southaven, Mississippi, on October 2, 2018. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Trump's America And Why 'The Cruelty Is The Point'

The Cruelty Is The Point: The Past, Present, and Future of Trump's America, is journalist Adam Serwer's new book, based on a popular essay he wrote for The Atlantic. Serwer talks with guest host Ayesha Rascoe and lays out the ways in which Donald Trump came to power, the historical roots of his vision of law and order, and how he managed to build a loyal political following on the basis of cruelty.

Trump's America And Why 'The Cruelty Is The Point'

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Sha'Carri Richardson competes in the Women's 100 Meter on day 2 of the 2020 U.S. Olympic Track & Field Team Trials at Hayward Field on June 19, 2021 in Eugene, Oregon. Andy Lyons/Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Lyons/Getty Images

The Weight On Black Women In Sports; Plus, 'We Are Lady Parts'

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Vin Diesel and Paul Walker in a scene from the film 'The Fast And The Furious', 2001. (Photo by Universal/Getty Images) Archive Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Archive Photos/Getty Images

Pop Culture Happy Hour: F9 Is Somehow Faster And Furious-er

Sam sits in the guest seat at Pop Culture Happy Hour to discuss the glue that holds this nation together — The Fast and the Furious franchise. Alongside NPR White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, as well as PCHH hosts Linda Holmes and Aisha Harris, the group talks about the legacy of the decades-spanning series, why we love to hate it, and how action films of this caliber could be considered "hetero camp."

Pop Culture Happy Hour: F9 Is Somehow Faster And Furious-er

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Allen Weisselberg, chief financial officer of Trump Organization Inc., center, exits from criminal court on Thursday, July 1, 2021. The Trump Organization's longtime chief financial officer has surrendered to authorities in New York, facing tax-related charges resulting from Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr.'s years-long criminal probe. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Trump's Bad Business Comes Back To Bite

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Riley Keough and Taylour Paige in Zola. Anna Kooris/A24 hide caption

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Anna Kooris/A24

Riley Keough On 'Zola' And Finding Empathy For Anti-Heroes

Sam interviews Riley Keough, one of the stars of Zola— a new movie adapted from a viral 148-tweet thread story full of sex work, guns and plot twists. They talk about how Riley prepared her character's "blaccent," why she tends to play unlikeable characters, and how she became a death doula.

Riley Keough On 'Zola' And Finding Empathy For Anti-Heroes

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Two men (L and R) against "critical race theory" (CRT) being taught in schools, speak with a female counter protester(C) that wants CRT to be taught, during a rally at the Loudoun County Government center in Leesburg, Virginia on June 12, 2021. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Culture Wars Then and Now; Plus, The Creators of 'Hacks'

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Priya and Ritu Krishna in their Dallas kitchen. NPR hide caption

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'Where We Come From': Priya And Ritu Krishna On Indian Cooking And Assimilation

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ACT UP demonstration at Foley Square, Federal Plaza, June 30, 1987. From left to right: Steve Gendin, DoneMark Aurigemma, Douglas Montgomery,Charles Stimson, Frank O'Dowd, Avram Finkelstein. Donna Binder hide caption

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Donna Binder

ACT UP: A History Of AIDS/HIV Activism

Forty years ago this month, the CDC reported on patients with HIV/AIDS in the United States for the very first time. The disease was understudied, under-reported and deeply stigmatized. ACT UP united a diverse, non-partisan group of individuals committed to direct action to end the AIDS crisis. In her new book, Let The Record Show: A Political History of ACT UP New York, 1987-1993, Sarah Schulman draws from nearly 200 interviews with ACT UP members to document the movement's history and explore how the group's activism transformed the way the media, the government, corporations and medical professionals talked about AIDS and provided treatment. She and Sam discuss this transformation and its relevance to social movements today.

ACT UP: A History Of AIDS/HIV Activism

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John Boyega attends the EE British Academy Film Awards ceremony at the Royal Albert Hall on February 2, 2020 in London, England. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto via Getty Images

Presenting 'Fresh Air': Actor John Boyega On Hollywood, Police And 'Star Wars'

Sam sits in the Fresh Air host chair to talk to actor John Boyega. Since finishing his star-making role in the Star Wars franchise in 2019 and after the protests that followed the murder of George Floyd last year, Boyega has been outspoken about his treatment as a Black actor in Hollywood, and in the Star Wars franchise itself. He talked to Sam about why he was ready to talk about the "elephant in the room" that is racism in Hollywood and what he's doing to change things.

Presenting 'Fresh Air': Actor John Boyega On Hollywood, Police And 'Star Wars'

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