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Star McCown

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Listener Héctor Zaanoni's family at the airport awaiting the arrival of Alicia Zaanoni from Peru. Courtesy of Héctor Zaanoni hide caption

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Courtesy of Héctor Zaanoni

The Best Things That Happened to You

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Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61

The Internet Culture Of Quarantine, Plus Selena's Legacy

Coronavirus has transformed pop culture and placed its creation in the hands of anyone who has social media. Sam chats with E. Alex Jung, a writer at New York Magazine, about pop culture's shift this year to the internet. Then, Sam talks to Alex Zaragoza, senior staff writer for culture at Vice, about her beef with the new Netflix series Selena: The Series and the exploitation of Selena.

The Internet Culture Of Quarantine, Plus Selena's Legacy

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Young female roommates using smart phones in apartment window during COVID-19 isolation Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images hide caption

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Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images

Pod Fatigue: How Coronavirus Lockdown Has Tested Friendships

Are you sick of the friends and family you've been stuck with? Sam teams up with Anna Sale, host of the WNYC podcast Death, Sex & Money, to explore how our pandemic 'pods' are being tested by the coronavirus. In this episode, Sam digs into friendships under strain. Then, head on over to the Death, Sex & Money podcast feed for Anna's look at how two people stuck apart during the pandemic have fallen in love.

Pod Fatigue: How Coronavirus Lockdown Has Tested Friendships

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Listener Dani with her boyfriend, Jack, by the water. Photo courtesy of Dani hide caption

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Photo courtesy of Dani

Life in the Time of Coronavirus

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Georgia State welcome sign at rest stop near Georgia border. Marje/Getty Images hide caption

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Marje/Getty Images

Georgia's Senate Runoffs, Plus W. Kamau Bell and Hari Kondabolu Talk Politics

Georgia's Senate runoffs have become national races as control of the Senate depends on who wins. Sam asks Tia Mitchell, Washington correspondent for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, if Georgia voters are looking at the runoffs the way the rest of the country is. Then, Sam chats with comedians W. Kamau Bell and Hari Kondabolu, hosts of the podcast "Politically Re-Active", about how the Left is processing the results of the 2020 election.

Georgia's Senate Runoffs, Plus W. Kamau Bell and Hari Kondabolu Talk Politics

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President-elect Joe Biden waves as he leaves The Queen theater, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2020, in Wilmington, Del. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Biden's Coronavirus Response, Plus Comedian Matt Rogers

What could a new president mean for the coronavirus pandemic? Sam talks to Ed Yong, staff writer at The Atlantic, about President-elect Joe Biden's coronavirus task force and how much the federal government can do to change the course of the pandemic. Then, Sam chats with comedian Matt Rogers, whose projects this year include competition show Haute Dog on HBO Max, Quibi's Gayme Show and the podcast Las Culturistas (which he hosts with SNL's Bowen Yang). They talk about pop culture and what's giving them joy in 2020.

Biden's Coronavirus Response, Plus Comedian Matt Rogers

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Zhanon Morales, 30, during a rally outside the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

What's Next For Biden And Democrats?

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Sarah Cooper in Sarah Cooper: Everything's Fine. 2020 LACEY TERRELL/NETFLIX/LACEY TERRELL/NETFLIX hide caption

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LACEY TERRELL/NETFLIX/LACEY TERRELL/NETFLIX

"Everything's Fine" With Sarah Cooper

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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, during the Democratic National Convention. Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2020. Uncredited/AP hide caption

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Uncredited/AP

Children listen as Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks as he visits East Las Vegas Community Center, Friday, Oct. 9, 2020, in Las Vegas. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

'They've Dismissed Us': How Latino Voter Outreach Still Falls Short

Latinos are the second largest group of eligible voters by race or ethnicity in the United States, but they continue to be misunderstood and underappreciated by political campaigns of all parties. Sam talks to Lisa García Bedolla, a scholar of Latino politics, about how the word "Latino" encompasses diverse communities of all political stripes and life experiences, and he checks in with the former mayor of a small town in Texas who's been thinking of Latino voter outreach for a long time.

'They've Dismissed Us': How Latino Voter Outreach Still Falls Short

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Early voters line up in West Lake Hills, Texas, at Westlake United Methodist Church on Tuesday, October 13, 2020. Acacia Coronado/AP hide caption

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Acacia Coronado/AP

Voting In Texas, Plus John Paul Brammer Gives Advice

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President Donald Trump during the first presidential debate Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

The Bench draped for the death of Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Supreme Court in Washington. Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020. Fred Schilling/AP hide caption

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Fred Schilling/AP

Supreme Court Misconceptions

When the biggest news stories happen all at once, it's easy to miss what each of them really means. Since Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death last week, there have been questions about who will replace her and what it means for the court. Sam talks to Slate's Mark Joseph Stern about the Supreme Court's history and what recent discussions get wrong. Then, Democrats and progressives brought in massive fundraising dollars in the days after Justice Ginsburg's death. Sam chats with Julie Bykowicz of the Wall Street Journal about what all that money means. Finally, Sam talks to Tina Vasquez of Prism about the forced sterilization of immigrants in a Georgia detention center, and why it's important to see the bigger picture.

Supreme Court Misconceptions

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Pre-school teacher Mikki Laugier, right, guides students in a lesson as they participate in an outdoor learning demonstration to display methods schools can use to continue on-site education during the coronavirus pandemic, Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020, at P.S. 15 in the Red Hook neighborhood of the Brooklyn borough of New York. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Karen Speros, 82, waits for a movie to start at a Regal movie theater in Irvine, Calif., Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Movie Industry Adapts, Plus LeVar Burton Reads

The movie industry is hurting. Most theaters in the U.S. are still shut down, and who knows when—or if—audiences will pack into theaters again. Adam B. Vary and Angelique Jackson of Variety talk about the state of the movie industry and how it's adapted, for better or worse, in this pandemic. Also, Sam talks to actor LeVar Burton about reading, why we like being read to, what he really wanted you to learn from Reading Rainbow, and the latest season of his podcast LeVar Burton Reads.

Movie Industry Adapts, Plus LeVar Burton Reads

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