Adedayo Akala
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Adedayo Akala

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2020 made moving a reality for millions of Americans. Some moved to be near family, others chose to pursue their pre-pandemic pipe dreams and move to distant locations in pursuit of a better lifestyle and a cheaper cost of living. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Working Remotely Allows Millions To Pick Where They Want To Live

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Some Say Working From Home Is Grinding Them Down

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Roslyn Clark Artis, president of Benedict College, hosted a graduation ceremony for 180 students in the school's football stadium in August. She says she would recommend a socially distanced commencement to other colleges and universities — but she acknowledges it's harder to pull off with thousands of graduates. AJ Shorter/Benedict College hide caption

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AJ Shorter/Benedict College

The Salvation Army's red-kettle campaign is expecting fewer donations and volunteers this year as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

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Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

A UPS driver stops at a traffic light on April 24 in St. Louis. UPS employees are now allowed to grow their beards as the company loosens up on its appearance rules. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Online delivery service Drizly said its alcohol sales were up 68% on Election Day, compared with the average of the previous four Tuesdays. Krisanapong Detraphiphat/Getty Images hide caption

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Krisanapong Detraphiphat/Getty Images

Halloween is one more thing being upended by the pandemic. Federal guidelines advise against traditional trick or treating, but parents across the country are trying to make the holiday special for their children anyway. Rebecca Nelson/Getty Images hide caption

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Rebecca Nelson/Getty Images

Demonstrators march in Chicago's Old Town neighborhood in June to demand a lifting of the Illinois rent control ban and a cancellation of rent and mortgage payments. The pandemic's financial pressures are causing many Americans to struggle with rent payments. Max Herman/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Max Herman/NurPhoto via Getty Images

'No One Can Live Off $240 A Week': Many Americans Struggle To Pay Rent, Bills

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Citigroup estimates the U.S. economy lost $16 trillion over the past 20 years as a result of discrimination against African Americans. Above, the American flag hangs in front of the New York Stock Exchange on Sept. 21. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A shopper enters a DSW store in New York City. DSW is partnering with Hy-Vee, a Midwest supermarket chain, to offer shoes in grocery stores. Nina Westervelt/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Nina Westervelt/Bloomberg via Getty Images