Nina Feldman
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Nina Feldman

Nina Feldman

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Andrei Doroshin, CEO of Philly Fighting Covid, speaks to reporters before the start of a COVID-19 vaccine clinic at the Pennsylvania Convention Center on Jan. 8. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

In Philadelphia, A Scandal Erupts Over Vaccination Startup Led By 22-Year-Old

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Why Philadelphia Gave A 22-Year-Old's Startup A Vaccine Contract — Then Canceled It

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Nikil Saval, a newly elected Pennsylvania state senator, speaks in support of opening a "supervised injection site" for opioid users in Philadelphia during a Nov. 16 rally outside the federal courthouse. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Software engineer Adriana Kaplan outside her home in South Philadelphia. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Without Clear Pandemic Rules, People Take On More Risks As Fear And Vigilance Wane

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Why Asking People To Change Their Behavior During The Pandemic Is So Hard

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Dr. Ala Stanford and her staff at a coronavirus testing site in Pennsylvania. Stanford created the Black Doctors COVID-19 Consortium and sends mobile test units into neighborhoods. Nina Feldman/WHYY hide caption

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The Black Doctors Working To Make Coronavirus Testing More Equitable

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Black Health Care Professionals Help Black Communities Battle Pandemic

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A mid-April sign in Philadelphia reminds passersby that current social distancing measures are for their own good. Cory Clark/ NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Cory Clark/ NurPhoto via Getty Images

In Pandemic, Green Doesn't Mean 'Go.' How Did Public Health Guidance Get So Muddled?

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Confusion Reigns Nationwide Amid Conflicting Coronavirus Rules

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Rosalind Pichardo advertises a daily food giveaway service in the heart of Philadelphia's Kensington neighborhood, where more people die of opioid overdoses than any other area in the city. Nina Feldman/ WHYY hide caption

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Nina Feldman/ WHYY

For Opioid Users, Pandemic Means New Dangers, But Also New Treatment Options

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Philadelphia residents, hospital workers, and local politicians protested the imminent closure of Hahnemann University Hospital at a rally on July 15, 2019. In March 2020, city leaders tried but failed to strike a deal with the hospital's new owner to reopen the facility for an expected coronavirus surge. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Judge: Planned Supervised Injection Site Does Not Violate Federal Drug Laws

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Supporters of safe injection sites in Philadelphia rallied outside this week's federal hearing. The judge's ultimate ruling will determine if the proposed "Safehouse" facility to prevent deaths from opioid overdose would violate the federal Controlled Substances Act. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Trump Administration Is In Court To Block Nation's 1st Supervised Injection Site

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Court To Rule On Philadelphia's Proposed Safe Injection Sites

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Richard Ost owns Philadelphia Pharmacy, in the city's Kensington neighborhood. He says he has stopped carrying Suboxone, for the most part, because the illegal market for the drug brought unwanted traffic to his store. Nina Feldman/WHYY hide caption

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It's The Go-To Drug To Treat Opioid Addiction. Why Won't More Pharmacies Stock It?

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