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Will Stone

Will Stone

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Physician Assistant Susan Eng-Na, right, administers a monkeypox vaccine during a vaccination clinic in New York. New cases are starting to decline in New York and some other U.S. cities. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

The monkeypox outbreak may be slowing in the U.S., but health officials urge caution

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The new booster shot would be an update to Pfizer's current version of the shot, which was designed for the original strain of the coronavirus. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

In many places, there's still a major shortage of monkeypox vaccines. A plan to stretch the U.S. supply could help get shots into arms more quickly, but it's also untested and introduces new challenges. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

The new U.S. monkeypox vaccine strategy offers more doses — and uncertainty

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention laid out new guidance for the national response to COVID-19 on Thursday. Tami Chappell/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tami Chappell/AFP via Getty Images

With new guidance, CDC ends test-to-stay for schools and relaxes COVID rules

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The monkeypox outbreak is growing in the U.S. and vaccines remain in short supply. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

With supplies low, FDA authorizes plan to stretch limited monkeypox vaccine doses

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The science isn't entirely settled on whether a rapid antigen test indicates whether a person is still contagious. Massimiliano Finzi/Getty Images hide caption

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Massimiliano Finzi/Getty Images

This 2003 electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows mature, oval-shaped monkeypox virions, left, and spherical immature virions, right, obtained from a sample of human skin associated with the 2003 prairie dog outbreak. Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Russell Regner/CDC via AP hide caption

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Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Russell Regner/CDC via AP

Nurses have had an up-close view of the pandemic deaths in the U.S.

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Workers at a family planning health center get emotional as thousands of abortion rights advocates march past their clinic on their way into downtown Chicago on May 14, 2022. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Some clinics are bracing for a huge influx of patients if Roe v. Wade is overturned

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Large numbers of people may travel to other areas if Roe v. Wade is overturned

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Tony Johnson sits on his bed with his dog, Dash, in the one-room home he shares with his wife, Karen Johnson, in a care facility in Burlington, Wash. on April 13, 2022. Johnson was one of the first people to get COVID-19 in Washington state in April of 2020. His left leg had to be amputated due to lack of wound care after he developed blood clots in his feet while on a ventilator. Lynn Johnson for NPR hide caption

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Lynn Johnson for NPR

People 60 years and older should not start taking daily aspirin to prevent heart attacks and strokes. Those currently taking it, can consult their doctors about whether to continue. Emma H. Tobin/AP hide caption

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Emma H. Tobin/AP