Will Stone
Stories By

Will Stone

Will Stone

Story Archive

Task force says most people should not take daily aspirin to prevent a heart attack

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1045746669/1045746670" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Registered nurse Christie Lindog works at the cardiovascular intensive care unit at Providence Cedars-Sinai Tarzana Medical Center in Tarzana, Calif., on Sept. 2. Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

Hospitals brace for an onslaught this winter, from flu as well as COVID

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1044342789/1044973192" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A rapid COVID-19 test swab is processed at Palos Verdes High School in Palos Verdes Estates on Tuesday, August 24, 2021. Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group/Long Beach Press-Telegram via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group/Long Beach Press-Telegram via Getty Images

What This Science Reporter Wishes He'd Known Before Getting Breakthrough COVID

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1038395135/1038395136" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Are COVID-19 Vaccine Boosters Necessary?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1038032158/1038032168" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Idaho, a record number of people are hospitalized with COVID-19, raising the possibility of rationing medical care. Many states are grappling with the fallout of the delta variant's surge in cases. Kyle Green/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Kyle Green/AP

A COVID Surge Is Overwhelming U.S. Hospitals, Raising Fears Of Rationed Care

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1034210487/1034242990" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

More Than 100,000 People Are In The Hospital For COVID. Some States May Ration Care

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1034137416/1034137417" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Testing your antibody levels to get a sense of your COVID-19 protection may be tempting, especially as you wait for a booster shot. But scientists say these widely available tests can't tell you the full story, at least not yet. Naveen Sharma/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty hide caption

toggle caption
Naveen Sharma/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty

Antibody Tests Should Not Be Your Go-To For Checking COVID Immunity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1031287076/1032738467" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A new U.S. intelligence report could not conclude whether the SARS-CoV-2 virus escaped from a lab in Wuhan, China or spilled over from an infected animal. Without more information about the early days of the outbreak, a more definitive explanation is unlikely, the report found. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ng Han Guan/AP
Dion MBD for NPR

What Causes Long COVID Is A Mystery. Here's How Scientists Are Trying To Crack It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1030723370/1030723371" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Only kids 12 and older are eligible — so far — to get vaccinated against COVID-19 in the U.S. But the shots could be available for younger children as soon as this fall, say researchers studying the vaccine in that age group. Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Chris O'Meara/AP

Having a compromised immune system puts you at higher risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19. Studies show that the initial vaccine doses are less effective for people with weakened immune systems. A third shot can boost protection. Christiana Botic/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Christiana Botic/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Moderna and Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines sit in a refrigerator at a mass vaccination site in June in Cranston, R.I. As demand for vaccines lags in the U.S., expiration dates loom. At the same time, lower-income countries are eager for more doses as infections rise. David Goldman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Goldman/AP

Alabama Just Tossed 65,000 Vaccines. Turns Out It's Not Easy To Donate Unused Doses

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1025463260/1025473044" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">