Will Stone
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Will Stone

Will Stone

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People 60 years and older should not start taking daily aspirin to prevent heart attacks and strokes. Those currently taking it, can consult their doctors about whether to continue. Emma H. Tobin/AP hide caption

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Emma H. Tobin/AP

Travelers sit in a waiting area at Rhode Island T.F. Green International Airport in Providence, R.I., on April 19. A federal judge's decision to strike down the federal mask mandate has left travelers to assess the risks of public transit on their own. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Travelers will need to continue to wear protective face masks at airports, on planes, trains, buses and transit hubs, as the CDC is extending the mask requirement for travelers. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

CDC extends transportation mask mandate until May 3

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Oxycodone pills Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

CDC weighs new opioid prescribing guidelines amid controversy over old ones

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Pain patients and doctors worry the CDC's new opioid guidelines may be damaging

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Sleeping with even a little bit of light isn't good for your health, study shows

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Sleeping in a room even a little bit of light can hurt a person's health, study shows

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Reseach is showing that people who are vaccinated, even with just one dose, tend to have lower rates of long COVID-19 after catching the virus than those who are unvaccinated. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Evidence grows that vaccines lower the risk of getting long COVID

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Being vaccinated reduces the chances of long COVID, the latest research shows

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Two COVID maps released and kept updated by the CDC. The map on the left reflects new metrics for monitoring the burden of COVID, with most counties in either the low or medium category. The map on the right reflects current COVID transmission levels, with the majority of counties at either substantial or high transmission. NPR/Centers for Disease Control hide caption

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NPR/Centers for Disease Control

What's your risk of getting COVID? The CDC recently changed the answer

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A large study found the incidence of cardiac and other serious cardiovascular problems was 4% higher in the 12 months after people were diagnosed with COVID-19 compared to those who were not infected. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

Not ready to go without a facemask? One-way masking can still reduce infection risk

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A family wearing face masks walks through Union Station in Los Angeles, California, January 5, 2022. With the Omicron variant driving a surge of Covid-19 cases, California announced January 5, 2022 that a statewide indoor mask mandate, due to expire on January 15, 2022, will be extended until at least February 15, 2022. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images