Will Stone
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Will Stone

Will Stone

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Containers of Moderna vaccines donated by the U.S. arrive last week in Bogotá, Colombia. Leonardo Munoz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Leonardo Munoz/AFP via Getty Images

Biden Says U.S. Leads The World In Vaccine Donations — And Promises More

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Amid A Vast Need For Vaccines Worldwide, Millions Of Doses In The U.S. Are Expiring

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Health workers arrive in a tuk-tuk to administer doses of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine to elderly citizens in their homes in Lima, Peru, in April. Ernesto Benavides/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ernesto Benavides/AFP via Getty Images

From Money To Monsoons: Obstacles Loom For Countries Awaiting Vaccine Doses

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Uncertainty Has Made It Hard For Countries Getting COVAX Vaccine Doses To Prepare

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Biden Wants Answers About COVID-19's Origin — But Pressuring China Could Backfire

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Security personnel stand guard outside the Wuhan Institute of Virology during the Feb. 3 visit of the World Health Organization team investigating the origins of the SARS-CoV-2, the virus that triggered a pandemic. Hector Retamal /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal /AFP via Getty Images

Unproven Lab Leak Theory Brings Pressure On China To Share Info. But It May Backfire

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President Biden steps into a motorcade vehicle after arriving Wednesday at Royal Air Force Mildenhall in Suffolk, England, on the first leg of his European trip. "We have to end COVID-19, not just at home, which we're doing, but everywhere," he said. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Vaccine doses are in short supply in African countries — and even when they arrive, there may not be a way to get them into people's arms in a timely fashion. Above: People wait to get vaccinated at a hospital in Thika, Kenya, in March. Patrick Meinhardt/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Meinhardt/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A movie released online by Children's Health Defense, an anti-vaccine group headed by Robert F. Kennedy Jr., resurfaces disproven claims about the dangers of vaccines and targets its messages at Black Americans who may have ongoing concerns about racism in medical care. Iryna Veklich/Getty Images hide caption

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Iryna Veklich/Getty Images

An Anti-Vaccine Film Targeted To Black Americans Spreads False Information

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More than 30 states have medical marijuana programs — yet scientists are only allowed to use cannabis plants from one U.S. source for their research. That's set to change, as the federal government begins to add more growers to the mix. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Learning How To Smell Again After COVID-19

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Darren Ford (left) reacts to the new mask guideline while presenting his vaccine card at Liberty Theatre on May 14 in Camas, Wash. Gov. Jay Inslee announced last Thursday that the statewide mask mandate would no longer apply to fully vaccinated adults. Nathan Howard/Getty Images hide caption

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Nathan Howard/Getty Images

Even With The No-Mask Guidance, Some Pockets Of The U.S. Aren't Ready To Let Go

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Vaccinated Residents Start To Remove Masks As Washington State Sees 4th COVID-19 Wave

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Sydney Porter of Bellevue, Wash., receives her COVID-19 vaccination from Kristine Gill, with the Seattle Fire Department's Mobile Vaccination Teams, before the game between the Seattle Mariners and the Baltimore Orioles at T-Mobile Park on May 5 in Seattle. A late spring COVID-19 surge has filled hospitals in the metro areas around Seattle. Steph Chambers/Getty Images hide caption

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Steph Chambers/Getty Images

4th Wave Of COVID-19 Hospitalizations Hits Washington State

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Washington State Seeing A 4th Wave Of COVID-19 Hospitalizations

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