Nada Homsi
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Nada Homsi

Nada Homsi

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Several people killed at protest held by Hezbollah supporters in Beirut

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Tracy and Paul Naggear, the parents of 3-year-old Alexandra, who was killed in last year's massive blast, raise their fists during a protest outside the home of caretaker Interior Minister Mohamed Fehmi, in Beirut, July 13. A year after the deadly blast, families of the victims are seeking justice for their loved ones. Bilal Hussein/AP hide caption

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Bilal Hussein/AP

Left: Anwar Alsaeedi stands with his children, Nada, 9, and Mazeen, 6, in the Yemeni capital Sanaa. Right: Hatem al-Showaiter with his daughter in Djibouti, when his daughter was three and half years old. She is now aged seven and half. Reem Alsaeedi; Hatem al-Showaiter hide caption

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Reem Alsaeedi; Hatem al-Showaiter

Some Yemenis Struggle For U.S. Visas Even After The End Of The Travel Ban

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Volunteers clear the Old Market district of debris in Aleppo, Syria, in 2019. Years of fighting have left many sections of Aleppo destroyed. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

Shattered containers remain in front of towering grain silos gutted in the August explosion at the Beirut port that claimed the lives of more than 200 people. Hussein Malla/AP hide caption

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Hussein Malla/AP

A cedar tree that burned in a recent wildfire, in the Mishmish forest, Akkar, Lebanon. Sam Tarling for NPR hide caption

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Sam Tarling for NPR

Climate Change Closes In On Lebanon's Iconic Cedar Trees

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Ibrahim Lasheen, 22, is brought back to his hometown of Tripoli, Lebanon, in September. A U.N. naval force rescued him after he swam for 18 hours to seek help for dozens of fellow passengers crammed on a small fishing boat that ran out of fuel as it headed to Cyprus. Hussein Malla/AP hide caption

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Hussein Malla/AP

'I Don't Want This Fate For My Children': Lebanese Leave Amid Growing Crisis

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A column of black smoke rises from a fire Thursday at a warehouse at Beirut's port. A Lebanese official said the fire is under control, according to local media. Hussein Malla/AP hide caption

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Hussein Malla/AP

A woman watches from her apartment balcony as a crane removes the rubble of a building after a Chilean rescue team detected signals there may be a survivor at the site in Beirut, Lebanon, on Sept. 4, 2020. Hussein Malla/AP hide caption

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Hussein Malla/AP

Rescue workers dig through the rubble of a badly damaged building in Lebanon's capital, Beirut, searching for possible survivors a month after a massive blast at the nearby port. Joseph Eid/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Eid/AFP via Getty Images

Rescue Workers Hope To Find Survivor Of Beirut Blast 1 Month Later

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The entrance to Nation Station, a disaster relief community center in Beirut that operates out of an abandoned gas station. Nation Station serves the residents of Geitawi, a neighborhood badly damaged in the Aug. 4 blast. Nada Homsi for NPR hide caption

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Nada Homsi for NPR

A medic checks the temperature of a Syrian worshipper before entering the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus to attend Friday prayer on May 15. To try to slow the coronavirus outbreak, the Syrian government has banned mass prayers and asked Syrians to stay home over the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha this weekend. Louai Beshara/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Louai Beshara/AFP via Getty Images

People walk and exercise at a promenade along the Mediterranean Sea during the coronavirus pandemic in Beirut on May 3. The Lebanese government has decided to reimpose restrictions after a rise in cases. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP