Laine Kaplan-Levenson Laine Kaplan-Levenson is a producer and reporter for NPR's Throughline podcast.
Laine Kaplan-Levenson
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Laine Kaplan-Levenson

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Laine Kaplan-Levenson
Britt Jacovich/NPR

Laine Kaplan-Levenson

Producer, Throughline

Laine Kaplan-Levenson is a producer and reporter for NPR's Throughline podcast. Before joining the Throughline team, they were the host and producer of WWNO's award-winning history podcast TriPod: New Orleans at 300, as well as WWNO/WRKF's award-winning political podcast Sticky Wicket. Before podcasting, they were a founding reporter for WWNO's Coastal Desk, and covered land loss, fisheries, water management, and all things Louisiana coast. Kaplan-Levenson has contributed to NPR, This American Life, Marketplace, Latino USA, Oxford American (print), Here and Now, The World, 70 Million, and Nancy, among other national outlets. They served as a host and producer of Last Call, a multiracial collective of queer artists and archivists, and freelanced as a storytelling and podcast consultant, workshop instructor, and facilitator of student-produced audio projects. Kaplan-Levenson is also the founder and host of the live storytelling series, Bring Your Own. They like to play music and occasionally DJ under the moniker DJ Swimteam.

Story Archive

Joelle Avelino Joelle Avelino hide caption

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Joelle Avelino

Supporters of former President Donald Trump gather outside the Capitol building in Washington D.C. Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Nikole Hannah-Jones, creator and author of the 1619 Project. The New York Times hide caption

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The New York Times

Presenting 'Throughline': Nikole Hannah-Jones and the war over history

In this special episode from our friends at Throughline, co-hosts Rund Abdelfatah and Ramtin Arablouei explore the war over history with Nikole Hannah-Jones, an investigative journalist at The New York Times and the creator of the 1619 Project. They discuss how the 1619 Project became one of the most dramatic battlegrounds in the fight over our country's historical narratives — and whether an agreed upon history could ever exist.

Presenting 'Throughline': Nikole Hannah-Jones and the war over history

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The sun sets over the dark Manhattan skyline on August 14, 2003. A power outage affected large parts of the northeastern United States and Canada. Robert Giroux/Getty Images hide caption

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A mugshot of Eugene V. Debs with his prisoner number in 1920. He was imprisoned in the Atlanta Federal Penitentiary for speaking out against the draft during World War I. The New York Public Library hide caption

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The New York Public Library

Ayn Rand, Russian-born American novelist, is shown in Manhattan with the Grand Central Terminal building in background in 1962. ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Thom Yorke, the singer of the British band Radiohead performs on the stage of the "Rock en Seine" music festival in 2006. STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP via Getty Images

Graffitied wall off Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt, February 11, 2011. Egyptians celebrated minutes after former President Mubarak resigned from his presidential duties in the early evening on February 11 in Cairo, Egypt. Kim Badawi Images/Getty Images hide caption

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A painting by artist Sidney King depicting a Dutch ship with 20 enslaved African people arriving at Point Comfort, VA in 1619, marking the beginning of slavery in America. Sidney King/Associated Press hide caption

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Sidney King/Associated Press

Aerial view of one of the burst dikes on the Mississippi River, April 1927. ullstein bild Dtl./ullstein bild via Getty Images hide caption

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Hokyoung Kim
Ian West/PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images

Bonus: The Deep History of Dune

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Hokyoung Kim